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Newsletter December 2020

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Volume 53, December 2020  Newsletter Editor: Dr G.B. Havenstein,  

 

wpsj editor vacancy 300x218      

 

The World's Poultry Science Journal is looking for a new Editor

 

2020 wpc

2020 wpc

 

World's Poultry Congres 2021

8-12 August 2021, Paris, France

 

 

Registration for WPC2021

Registration for WPC2021 is open. Click here for details.

 

Executive Committee

Secretary's Report

mulder roel

Board meeting and latest news

The board of WPSA held a virtual meeting early October. Annual reports from the president, secretary, treasurer, federation presidents and the Journal editor were discussed. The latest news about the World’s Poultry Congress in 2021 in Paris, France, was presented. The preparations are continuing, the programme is almost finalised and depending on the worldwide COVID-19 situation the congress will be held from 8-12 August 2021.
Several committees (International Poultry Hall of Fame, Paul Siegel Research Award, Education Award, Cliff D. Carpenter International Essay Award) finalised their work for WPC2021, the results will be kept confidential.

More information on WPC2021: www.wpcparis2021.com.

The financial situation of WPSA is in good shape, total number of members is 8165, with 76 national branches. We thank our sponsors and advertisers for their generous support.
As branches have been suffering from the COVID-19 pandemic, the board will give as much as possible support to them. Branches are invited to contact the secretariat with proposals.

Starting 2020 the World’s Poultry Science Journal is hosted and produced by Taylor & Francis Publishers. The transition from the previous publisher was well underway, than the COVID-19 pandemic came and caused an unprecedented disruption to the global distribution network. Restrictions in international freight carriage and slow operating or even closed postal services caused considerable delays. The print and distribution of the journal was resumed mid-May. The March, June and September issue have been mailed, the December issue is ready.

During the board meeting Dr Lucy Waldron announced her resignation as editor of the WPS Journal. Dr Waldron has been active in this position for almost 13 years and the board thanked her for her commitment and service to the association. A search for a new editor will start soon. On this moment Dr Julie Roberts, Australia, is our acting interim editor and together with the help of the members of the editorial board and of Taylor & Francis the next issues will be produced.

For more communication news can also be found on the WPSA website and our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/wpsa.world/). A special calendar for  webinars from associations and our supporting sponsors and advertisers has been added on the website. New activities can be sent to

Dr Roel Mulder, General Secretary

Treasurer's Report

bradley francine new

I write this short report from my ‘biosecure nest.’ It is with relief that I report that while some members of the WPSA flock have experienced COVID-19 in their families, all are fully recovered or recovering. I would like to think that the biosecurity practices we have taught in the poultry industry, have made us excellent students and early adopters of COVID-19 prevention and treatment practices.

Your WPSA Executive Committee has continued to work at home. Our travel wings remain clipped and we are doing our best to keep in communication with Branches and individual members. I am delighted to report that the Secretary of the Bolivia Branch, Fernando Peña Torrez, has initiated a programme to increase WPSA’s visibility and service-to-members in Latin and South America. Details on his programme will be described in upcoming newsletters.

May you and your family end 2020 in safety, and start the New Year in good health and with the hope of effective COVID-19 vaccinations for all who need them.Dr Francine Bradley, Treasurer

26th World's Poultry Congress

Palais de Congrès, August 8-12, 2021, Paris, France

REMINDER: THERE IS ONLY TILL DECEMBER 31, 2020 TO SUBMIT A NEW ABSTRACT AND TO ENJOY THE BENEFIT OF REGISTRATION AT THE REGULAR WPC2020 PRICE for WPC2021!

20WPC blocmarque blocdatesThe organising committee is actively working to welcome the WPSA community to Paris. We are working on all options to insure a large group of participants for the meeting. The sanitary crisis will not prevent us from holding the event in Paris, 8 to 12 August 2021, https://wpcparis2021.com/

Please look at the preliminary programme with the updated list of invited speakers Synopsis – world poultry congress | 2021 | PARIS (wpcparis2021.com). All authors who submitted abstracts in 2019 and were asked to modify their texts will receive a final answer within a few days.

The submission site remains open for new abstracts, until 31 December 2020. Do not miss this chance to present your recent work.

Registrations that were already made for WPC2020 are valid for WPC2021. The same regular fee holds for new registrations until 31 December 2020. WPC2021 will give all members of WPSA the opportunity to join together to celebrate the 100 years that World Poultry Congresses have been held, since the first WPC was organised in 1921.

wpc2021 100

Let's celebrate! 

 

Christophe Bostvironnois, President French Branch
Michael Duclos, Secretary, French Branch
Michèle Tixier Boichard, WPC2020, Chair of WPC2021

Poultry Educational Resources

In her role as one of the Vice Presidents of the WPSA, Julie Roberts from the Australian Branch has compiled a list of Poultry Educational Resources which are available free of charge via the internet. Some of the web sites listed also have resources for sale. However, the focus of this list is resources which are free and therefore available to all members.

The list is posted on the WPSA website, and will always be a ‘work in progress’ as some resources become available and added, or others, if they are out of date or no longer available, will be removed from the internet list.

If members are aware of other resources that are available that could be added to the list, please contact Mrs Dorien Velner at the main office by email: with the title of the resource, how to access it and a short description.

All entries will be checked on a regular basis to make sure that they continue to be available, however if you find any irregularities, please contact us at

 

European Federation

The next European Poultry Conference will be held in Valencia, Spain in 2022.

The European Federation has numerous conferences planned between now and on into 2022. A list of most of our upcoming conferences may be found on the WPSA Calendar at www.wpsa.com
News from several European Federation Working Groups are provided below.

WPSA European Working Group News

WG2

2021 espn

In order to avoid overlapping with the WPC that has been changed to August 8 - 12, 2021, the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) has been moved from 2021 to take place at the same planned venue, Palacongressi in Rimini, from 5 to 8 September, 2022. Our Branch would like to thank VET International and Palacongressi of Rimini for their cooperation and understanding during this time. Despite this difficult situation, we also much appreciate sponsors and partners who are confirming their support for our event. Of course, we will work hard during the coming months to ensure the postponed edition of the 23rd ESPN is a success. The city of Rimini is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly Venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and will help forge the future of poultry meat science. Additional details are available at the Symposia website: https://www.espn2022.eu/

WG3

Breeding and Genetics

The 12th symposium on Breeding and Genetics is being planned. It will take place in Hannover, 8-10 November 2022, and will be hosted by the German Branch. We would be pleased if you save this date and plan your participation. Further information will follow in due course.

Steffen Weigend, Chairman of the European Federations Working Group 3

WG4

Quality of Eggs and Egg Products

Due to the postponement of the World’s Poultry Congress caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, the WG4 meeting has been re-scheduled to take place during WPC2021 in August 2021, in Paris. Members who want to suggest topics to be discussed are more than welcome and can send their suggestions to the Chairpersons (; ).

WG5

Poultry Meat Quality

2021 Eggmeat logo EMQ

As for all European Symposia, the next 'XXV European Symposium on the Quality of Poultry Meat' conjointly held with the 'XIX European Symposium on the Quality of Eggs and Egg Products' have been postponed to June 8 to 10, 2022, thanks to the cooperation with the Polish Branch. The venue will be the same in Kraków, Poland, and the conference website is already available. The next WG5 member meeting will be held during World's Poultry Congress 2021 in Paris.

Massimiliano Petracci, Secretary Italian Branch of WPSA

WG6

Incubation and Fertility Research Group (IFRG)

Due to the spread of the Covid-19 virus, which has created lots of uncertainty for traveling, WG6 (IFRG) has postponed its 2020 meeting and has rescheduled it for October 14-15, 2021 at the Holiday Inn in Leiden, The Netherlands. For more information see the website.

Ampai Nangsuay, Secretary WG6

WG10

Turkeys

The 11th 'Hafez' International Symposium on Turkey Production will be held in Berlin, Germany; May/June 2021. I hope to see you in Berlin.

Prof. Dr. Dr. H. M. Hafez, Institute of Poultry Diseases, Free University Berlin, Chair WG10


Asia Pacific Federation

WPSA Asian-Pacific Working Group News

A/P WG3

Ratites

There will be Ratite Research Sessions during the upcoming World Poultry Congress in Paris, France from 8-12 August 2021. Please send any suggestions for contributions and topics to .

Researchers involved in research on any Ratites (ostriches, emus, rheas, cassowaries or kiwis) are asked to contact the Ratite Group. Please send an email to .

Anel Engelbrecht, Chair

 

7th Mediterranean Poulty Summit

2021 7mpsDue to the current health situation and the uncertainty generated by the covid-19, the organizing Committees of the 7th Mediterranean Poultry Summit have decided to postpone again the event until October 6-8, 2021.

This difficult and sad decision is taken after a first postponement. At that time, we thought that the 6-month period contemplated for carrying out the MPS was enough time for the health situation to be controlled throughout the world. However, the world situation and the restrictions on capacity indoors suggest that a new postponement is the best option.

I hope the situation changes in one year and we can meet again face to face.

Thank you for your patience and support.

Warmest regards,

Carlos Garcés Narro

Details for the conference are shown on the website summit’s website: www.mpn-wpsa.org.

 

World's Poultry Science Journal

From 2020 the World’s Poultry Science Journal will be published by Taylor & Francis. If you have requested an online subscription as part of your membership, you have received an email from Taylor & Francis with instructions how to access WPSJ online from the new website www.tandfonline.com/TWPS. Please ensure that you add '@tandfonline.com' to your safe senders list to ensure these types of emails are not sent to your spam folder or blocked by your service provider. Should you have any questions about your online access please contact ”.

Upcoming articles

Articles in upcoming Journal(s)

  • E. Baéza - Characteristics of processed poultry products
  • R.A. Swick - Dietary calcium and meat and bone meal as potential precursors for the onset of necrotic enteritis
  • R. Toroghi - Implementation of high-level biosecurity measures can reduce the baseline antibody titers of Newcastle disease in non-integrated layer flocks in northeast Iran
  • E. Baéza - Use of algae in poultry production: a review
  • H. Lukanov - Domestication changes in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica): a review
  • S. Elnesr - Nutritional significance of aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis Miller) and its beneficial impact on poultry
  • A. Salamon - Factors affecting the production of double-yolked eggs
  • S.A. Mtshali - A review of adaptive immune responses to Eimeria tenella and Eimeria maxima challenge in chickens
  • I.C.S. Araújo - Thermal manipulations of birds during embryogenesis

Summaries

Characteristics of processed poultry products

E. BAÉZA

Poultry is now the most consumed meat, in terms of volume. A main factor for the continuous increase of poultry production is the huge development of cut pieces and processed products. The nutritional quality of such products is quite variable. For example, the protein and lipid contents of chicken nuggets are between 9.8 and 31.0% and 7.5 and 25.0%, respectively. Different ingredients, such as vitamin E, thyme or rosemary essential oils can be used during processing to increase the shelf life of products by decreasing oxidation susceptibility and/or limiting microbial contamination. For example, adding 0.2% thyme essential oil caused a 40% decrease in TBARS value (an indicator of lipid peroxidation) in chicken nuggets stored at -20°C for six months and a 41.0% decrease in the number of Staphylococcus aureus in sausages fermented for 28 days. To answer consumer and/or public authorities’ requests, recipes for processed products can be modified to decrease, for example, their fat or salt (sodium chloride) contents. The quality of processed products mainly depends on technological processes, and preservation and cooking conditions. For instance, high cooking temperatures during frying or roasting can induce the formation of undesirable compounds which are harmful for consumers. Finally, poultry meat has high protein content and low lipid and saturated fatty acid levels. Its nutritional characteristics are, therefore, rather favourable for the health of consumers, but for the most processed products (nuggets, cordons bleus, kebabs) the industry has completely modified these characteristics to make food rich in carbohydrates, lipids and salt, which are not desirable.

Nutritional precursors for necrotic enteritis

H.K. ZANU, S.K. KHERAVII, M.R. BEDFORD and R.A. SWICK

Necrotic enteritis (NE) is an enteric disease of poultry caused by Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens). The incidence of NE has increased in several countries as a result of restrictions on the use of in-feed antibiotics. This disease may be triggered by a combination of coccidiosis and the presence of undigested nutrients in the hindgut providing nutrients and high pH that favour the proliferation of pathogens. Meat and bone meal (MBM) inclusion rates above 4% and higher dietary calcium (Ca) inclusion rates above 1.0 % may potentially favour the overgrowth of enteric pathogens, including C. perfringens. High levels of elastin, collagen and keratin from MBM are refractory to gastric digestion and may act as nutrient substrates for C. perfringens. Such proteins are metabolised by C. perfringens by putrefactive fermentation, producing trimethylamine and ammonia, that affect gut health and increase the pH of digesta. Digesta pH may become elevated by feeding a diet high in Ca, as this nutrient has a high acid-binding capacity. Calcium interacts with phytic acid, forming mineral-phytate complexes that decrease the activity of exogenous dietary phytase. This reduces digestion and increases the influx of nutrients into the hindgut. Similarly, smaller particle sizes (dgw <75 μm) and high solubility of some Ca sources could increase digesta pH and chelation of Ca by phytic acid and decrease nutrient digestibility. Whether the practice of overfeeding Ca in order to ensure this nutrient is not limiting for bone development may be putting the bird at risk of a NE outbreak is not known. This review discusses the potential for dietary MBM to exacerbate NE in broiler chickens. The impact of Ca level and particle size to affect gut pH and phytase efficacy are discussed, with inferences to alter the onset of NE.

Implementation of high-level biosecurity measures can reduce the baseline antibody titres of Newcastle disease in non-integrated layer flocks in northeast Iran

R. TOROGHI, I. SALAMATIAN, M.R. BASSAMI, N. IRANKHAH, A. EMARLOO, A. MAHOUTI and S. GHAVI

Newcastle disease (ND) is an OIE listed viral infection that has spread throughout developed and underdeveloped countries, either as an endemic or epizootic disease. ND has been endemic in several developing countries in non-integrated poultry production systems. Serological baselines of poultry diseases can be established and monitored as a useful and reliable tool to design effective strategies for prevention and control of infectious diseases, yet almost no comprehensive report on serological baseline values is yet available. This review covers the situation of ND in northeast Iran during 2009-2018, and ND serological baselines of layer flocks in Khorasan-e-Razavi Province in Iran are presented for the first time. The mean haemaglutination inhibition (HI) titres for NDV throughout the production cycle of layer flocks in the two periods 2009-2015 and 2016-2018 were around 9.5 Log2 (range 7.9 to 11.4) and 7 Log2 (range 6 to 9.1), respectively. In addition to a 2.5 Log2 decrease in HI antibody titres, a significant decline was seen in the rate of incidence, mortality and clinical manifestations of respiratory diseases, especially ND. Interestingly, layer flocks reached a significant milestone in the adoption of biosecurity practices during the first emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza in the early months of 2016. It was concluded that increased application of biosecurity in non-integrated poultry production systems of developing countries may take priority over the other control/preventive measures against ND. There is a need for other control and prevention studies to be promoted in developing countries, empowering them to formulate and adopt strategies that move beyond the conventional approaches and aim at international health and trade.

Use of algae in poultry production: a review

E. COUDERT, E. BAÉZA and C. BERRI

Algae represent a large and new source of nutrients with other health benefits as supplements in animal feed formulations. ‘Algae’ is a generic term that groups brown, green, and red types of both macro- and micro-algae. These marine plants may play a key role in the future for poultry production, as they constitute a new and valuable nutrient source, thanks to their nutritional composition and richness in as polyphenols, polysaccharides and fatty and amino acids. Many studies have evaluated the advantages and inconvenience of using micro- and macro-algae in poultry nutrition and their ability to improve animal health and, thus, welfare. This review describes the main nutritional characteristics of algae and the current knowledge on their effects in poultry production, impacts on animal health, growth performance and product quality (eggs and meat). The increase in laying rate and egg weight can reach +4.0 to 8.6 percentage points and +1.3 to 1.5 g, respectively. The increase in body weight of broilers and decrease in feed conversion ratio can vary from 5% to 22% and from 4% to 15%, respectively. According to the literature, a dietary incorporation rate of 2% for microalgae or a range between 1% and 5% for macroalgae is suitable for both laying hens and broiler chickens, even though these ranges greatly depend on the type of algae used and the expected benefits for poultry production.

Domestication changes in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica)

H. LUKANOV and I. PAVLOVA

Domestic quail (Coturnix japonica domestica) is a domesticated gallinaceous bird that originated in East Asia with ancestor the wild Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). Subsequently to domestication, quails have undergone a number of morphological, ethological and productive changes that make them quite different from those of their wild ancestors. These reflect greater intraspecific differences than even in the differences between species in the genus Coturnix. Unlike the wild quail, a variety of other plumage colours are seen in the domestic quail, the most popular being variations of golden, tuxedo, extended brown and recessive white. The average live weight of the wild Japanese quail varies within 85-110 g, whereas the domestic quails are about 45% to more than 250% heavier, depending to their productive type. Major differences are visible in the migratory, sexual, nesting and brooding behaviour, and other ethological reactions such as vocalisation, mating calls, aggression and fighting. A number of productive parameters have been affected by domestication. Wild Japanese quails lay about 5-14 eggs per clutch, with 2-3 broods per year. Domestic quails could lay more than 250 eggs per year with average egg weight increase of 20% in egg production to 100% in meat production compared to their ancestors. This review summarises how domestication and human impact affect a number of features, significantly altering the Japanese quail. The aim is to emphasise the changes that occurred during the domestication of Japanese quails, supporting the proposal of using the term ‘domestic quail’. (Coturnix japonica domestica).

Nutritional significance of aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis Miller) and its beneficial impact on poultry

A.A. EBRAHIM, S.S. ELNESR, M.A.A. ABDEL-MAGEED and M.M.M. ALY

The purpose of any supplement in the diet is to take advantage of its beneficial effects on performance, development, health, with the aim of stabilisation of digestion along with improved feed efficiency. Aloe vera is one such supplement. Its use has increased in nutrition and veterinary uses because of its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, antiviral, antiparasitic and antifungal properties. These activities come from various biologically active constituents, including minerals, vitamins, sugars, enzymes, anthraquinones or phenolic compounds, saponins, amino acids, lignin and sterols. Supplementation with aloe vera in poultry diets improves productive performance, enhances digestion and reduces disease incidence. Research has shown that dietary supplementation of aloe vera (0.1-1.0%) positively increased body weight by 7-25%, and improved immunological indices by 10-50%. Feed treatment with 0.5-1% aloe vera reduced harmful bacteria in the gut by 24% and increased beneficial bacterial populations by 30%. This review includes information on the inclusion of aloe vera in poultry feed, and how it may be useful as a natural supplement without side effects to maximise overall poultry productivity.

Factors affecting the production of double-yolked eggs

A. SALAMON

Double yolked eggs are a rare phenomenon in domestic poultry and game birds, generally ~1-2% of the eggs are double-yolked (DY) over the laying cycle. The production of such eggs is influenced by several factors from which the most important ones include genetics, selection for multiple ovulations, female age, light exposure and nutrition. It is known that higher body weight is the result of selection, and has been correlated to the increase in multiple ovulations. The increased incidence of DY eggs is a consequence of the multiple ovulations, which are more prevalent in the first 10 weeks of laying, when up to 25% of follicles develop as pairs, because the regulation of follicle maturation and ovulation is not fully established. This regulation involves endocrinological and physiological changes, which are mediated by light, and management during rearing and laying is crucial to reduce DY eggs. Restricted feeding (~50% daily feed intake of ad libitum) results in decreased follicle production and multiple ovulations, hence reduces DY egg production. Feed should contain less protein (<16%) to control body weight gain. However, if DY egg production is the goal, birds should be fed ad libitum with high protein (>16%) to achieve higher body weights. Furthermore, applying photostimulation early (6-12 weeks of age for domestic fowl), increasing photoperiod to 13-16 hours of light and light intensity (>80 lux) can help prevent DY.

A review of adaptive immune responses to Eimeria tenella and Eimeria maxima challenge in chickens

S.A. MTSHALI and M.A. ADELEKE

Adaptive immune responses in poultry against the invading parasites are complex, involving both specific and non-specific immunity. Attempts in finding new vaccine candidates for Eimeria parasite infection control are continuing, and any promising candidates that have been discovered so far are only effective against homologous infection. Different genes are involved in coccidiosis protection and take part in Eimeria infections. Expression library immunization (ELI) is a novel method for systematic screening of genomes to identify new vaccine candidates. Some of these antigens have yielded promising results, with rEtIMP-1 and EtIMP1-CD40L reducing oocysts output with 66% and 78% respectively in chickens challenged with Eimeria tenella by inducing immune responses. The significance of cytokines in inducing immunity against the invading parasite cannot be ignored, as they provide support to both innate and adaptive immune responses. Adaptive immune responses and genes expressed in response to E. maxima and E. tenella challenges are important. Possible immunogenic vaccine candidates derived from Eimeria antigens have potential for control, diagnosis and treatment strategies for coccidiosis.

Thermal manipulations of birds during embryogenesis

B.T.A. COSTA, T.S.B. LOPES, M.A. MESQUITA, L.J.C. LARA and I.C.S. ARAÚJO

Broilers are subject to adverse environmental conditions, especially temperature, which decreases performance and increases disease vulnerability. Understanding how the mechanisms involved in thermoregulation of the embryo function is essential for improving production. Studies have shown that thermal manipulation should occur late during embryonic development (14th to 18th day of incubation) and factors, such as hormones, neurotransmitters and cytokines, are involved in programming the thermoregulatory system. Several methodologies have been applied in experimental situations regarding the frequency, intensity and duration of thermal stimuli during the embryonic period. Hatching yield can be improved, despite different handling strategies, however, there are still divergent results regarding the ability of birds to adapt to thermal stimuli. Thermal management can alter vascular development and hormone levels in embryos. In contrast to high temperature thermal manipulation, using lower incubation temperatures can positively influence the quality of newly hatched chicks. In general, positive results were observed for thermal manipulation by cold or heat when embryos were stressed for 2 to 6 h/day. Higher hatchability and performance under normal conditions was observed in experiments using temperatures from 36.4 to 36.7oC. Better performance was seen under heat stress conditions in the final phase (21-35 days) when using temperatures from 39.2 to 39.5oC. Thermal manipulation modulates the expression of heat shock proteins (HSP), which vary with stimulus type (heat/cold), breed, tissue and bird age. Finally, thermal manipulation can be effective in helping birds adapt to the breeding environment; however, it is necessary to refine certain points. The present review found thermal manipulation during embryo development was effective at increasing hatchability and performance of broilers.

Branch News

France

The officers of the branch’s board met by video conference on 25 September 2020. The next meeting will take place in December 2020. See http://wpsa.fr/qui-sommes-nous/conseil-administration

The 2021 general assembly of WPSA-France will take place online 18 March 2021, during a scientific session called ‘WPSA Thursday’ dedicated to the topic ‘Resilience of the poultry production chain following one year of COVID-19’.

The Branch renews its call to all members for their participation in WPC2021 in Paris on 8-12 August 2021, and for the preparation for this event, which will also mark the centenary of WPSAs World Poultry Congresses.

Christophe Bostvironnois, President, and Michel Duclos, secretary WPSA France 

Germany

Due to the ongoing pandemic, we will hold our annual Spring Conference for the German Branch in a digital format on March 19, 2021. Please make a note of this on your calendar.

The XII European Symposium on Poultry Genetics is being planned for Hannover, 08 – 11, 2022. Information will follow.

Inga Tiemann, Secretary, Germany Branch

Italy

2020 fier avicolaThe next annual national meeting will be organized in conjunction with the 2021 edition of FIERAVICOLA which will be held at the Rimini Expo Centre from 4 to 6 May. General information on the International Poultry Exhibition is available on the website: https://www.fieravicola.com/en/.

The Italian Branch will host the 23rd edition of European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) which will be held at the Palacongressi of Rimini (Italy) from 5 to 8 September, 2022. The city of Rimini, is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly Venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and helping to forge the future of poultry meat science. More details are already available at the Symposia website: https://www.espn2022.eu/.

2022 ESPN logo

Massimiliano Petracci, Secretary, Italian Branch of WPSA

Japan

The 2021 Spring Meeting of the Japan Poultry Science Association (JPSA) will be held in online (web) style. All activities during the meeting, including presentations of original research findings, a general meeting, and the council meeting, will be organised on the web at the end of March. Details will be announced soon on the JPSA web site (https://jpn-psa.jp/). In the meantime, registration for the presentations of original research findings will be started at the beginning of January 2021, and the deadline will be January 26th, 2021. The details for the registration will also be informed via the JPSA web site.

The Journal of Poultry Science (JPS - the official journal of JPSA, IF: 0.880), the official scientific journal published by JPSA, became a member of PubMed Central (PMC), and articles published in the journal can now be accessed through the PubMed search engine. We welcome the contribution of original research articles and reviews to the JPS using the following web site: https://jpn-psa.jp/en/jps-en/. Free access to download the full-published articles in JPS is available on J-Stage (https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/browse/jpsa), which provides an excellent opportunity for all to access the published articles.

JPSA would like to contribute not only to poultry science in Japan, but all over the world by enhancing activities with members from other countries. Thus, JPSA has a membership category for foreign citizens residing abroad as ‘Special International Member’. The page charges for publishing their papers in the JPS will be set at the regular membership price. JPSA welcomes new members from all over the world. Please visit the JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/?lang=en) for further information.

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a tough situation in the world, but JPSA hopes things will get better soon. Please take good care of yourself!

Naoki Goto, Secretary of WPSA Japan Branch

Russia

Scientific communication with industry: The VNITIP Federal Scientific Centre of the Russian Science Academy in Serguiev Posad, Moscow Region, recognises the importance of scientific communication with the industry and has a programme to encourage this effort. Every year more than 1000 experts from Russia and abroad attend lectures from leading scientists in poultry industry areas, exchange experiences and discuss innovations from local and foreign poultry science efforts in Ptitsegrad. All are welcome to attend the courses in Serguiev Posad.

Tatiana Vasilieva, Secretary

United Kingdom

New Opportunity: The GD Rosen Academic Career Advancement Award

The UK branch is pleased to announce a new Academic Career Advancement Award in memory of Professor Gordon D Rosen. Gordon contributed a highly logical and very descriptive approach to animal nutrition from the 1960s through to just a few years before his death in 2015. A full obituary for him is available in volume 71 of World’s Poultry Science Journal. He was an inspirational person whose curiosity and gently framed yet penetrating questions made him a legend. There is a generation of scientists influenced by his presence – always in the front row – of scientific meetings, and now his wife Vanda would like to encourage other scientists to develop their own inquisitiveness through this new award.

The GD Rosen Academic Career Advancement Award provides £2000 each year to fund an academic adventure. With this aim, the award is open in nature, while particularly encouraging people to become multidisciplinary in their approach to research. The award is open to UK branch members who are within their early career spanning from 2 years to 5 years post PhD viva. Examples of proposals might include a request to attend an academic conference (particularly one outside your core field), support for an educational tour of another country or global region, support to visit another institution to learn a new technique or approach, or support to publish a major research output in a journal requiring publication fees.

Proposal forms and conditions of the GD Rosen Award can be found on the WPSA-UK website.

Deadline for applications: 30th January 2021

 

Newsletter March 2021

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
Volume 54, March 2021  Newsletter Editor: Dr G.B. Havenstein,  

 

2020 wpc

2020 wpc

 

World's Poultry Congres 2021

8-12 August 2021, Paris, France

 

 

Registration for WPC2021

Registration for WPC2021 is open. Click here for details.

 

Executive Committee

Secretary's Report

mulder roel

Board meeting and latest news

The worldwide COVID-19 pandemic has caused a disturbance of all our activities, whether these were national branch meetings, international scientific meetings or participation in exhibitions. Also contacts within branches sometimes are difficult. Several branches have organised online meetings, the Pakistan branch has formed a women wing of the branch. More on the last activity is elsewhere in this newsletter.
The board will give as much as possible support to branches in order to keep them prepared for the post COVID-19 era. Proposals are invited by the secretariat.

The board of WPSA held a virtual meeting specially focused on the World’s Poultry Congress 2020, to be held 8-12 August 2021 in Paris, France.
The worldwide COVID-19 situation and the many travel restrictions (travel and issuing visas) are of big concern. With these concerns the organisers expect that the hybrid Congress they planned will not be possible. Final decisions are expected in March.
More information on WPC2021: www.wpcparis2021.com.

The World’s Poultry Science Journal, hosted and produced by Taylor & Francis Publishers, is now almost back on track. The March issue is being finalised and ready for print.

WPS Journal editor. On this moment Dr Julie Roberts, Australia, is our acting interim editor and together with the help of the members of the editorial board and of Taylor & Francis the next issues will be produced. The Journal Publication Committee is expecting to announce a new editor in March.

WPSA recently has joined the International Poultry Welfare Alliance (www.poultrywelfare.org). More details about the participation will become available soon.

More communications and other news can be found on the WPSA Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/wpsa.world/) and website. A special section is now reserved for webinars from associations and our supporting sponsors and advertisers. New activities can be sent to .

Dr Roel Mulder, General Secretary

Treasurer's Report

bradley francine new

No wing web stab or eye drop, but I am grateful to state that my arm has been injected twice with the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. Having said that, I realise that a large portion of the world’s population has still not been vaccinated and is in lock-down. 

While it may not be possible (or legal) for you to hold a normal/large meeting in your country, you certainly can be doing other projects to support your Branch members. I encourage you to think of ways to keep your members connected to WPSA and to your Branch during the pandemic. There may possibly be information that you would like all of your members to receive in hard copy form. It may be that your university(ies) with poultry programmes have worked out protocols so students can be in the classroom. If so, maybe your Branch can sponsor an event for the students and introduce them to WPSA. Obviously, all these activities require funds. WPSA has its Branch Development Programme available, and there are funds there that the Branch can apply for to improve your programmes.

I encourage Branch officers to visit the WPSA web site (www.wpsa.com) and then go to ‘Support for Branches’ and ‘Branch Development Proposal.’ Information can be found there on how to apply for these funds, and lists of recently funded applications are there for your perusal that you can use as a potential guideline for the development of a proposal for your branch. As I sit here, I am ready to wire funds for approved applications, but I remind you: You must apply in order to have the possibility of receiving Branch Development Funds!

I wish you a safe and healthy spring.

Dr Francine Bradley, Treasurer

26th World's Poultry Congress

Palais de Congrès, August 8-12, 2021, Paris, France

We are continuously following the evolution of the COVID-19 situation and its potential effect on 26th World’s Poultry Congress.

The good news is that we received another set of 300 abstracts in 2020 and have a lot of new knowledge to share with the WPSA community.

We continue working on the preparation of the WPC and are presently studying all possible options to insure a safe event with a large participation.

The organising committee is committed to prepare a successful World’s Poultry Congress and will publish regular updates on https://wpcparis2021.com

20WPC blocmarque blocdates 

wpc2021 100

Let's celebrate! 

 

Christophe Bostvironnois, President French Branch
Michael Duclos, Secretary, French Branch
Michèle Tixier Boichard, WPC2020, Chair of WPC2021

Poultry Educational Resources

In her role as one of the Vice Presidents of the WPSA, Julie Roberts from the Australian Branch has compiled a list of Poultry Educational Resources which are available free of charge via the internet. Some of the web sites listed also have resources for sale. However, the focus of this list is resources which are free and therefore available to all members.

The list is posted on the WPSA website, and will always be a ‘work in progress’ as some resources become available and added, or others, if they are out of date or no longer available, will be removed from the internet list.

If members are aware of other resources that are available that could be added to the list, please contact Mrs Dorien Velner at the main office by email: with the title of the resource, how to access it and a short description.

All entries will be checked on a regular basis to make sure that they continue to be available, however if you find any irregularities, please contact us at

 

European Federation

The European Federation has numerous conferences planned between now and on into 2022. A list of most of our upcoming conferences may be found on the WPSA Calendar at www.wpsa.com
News from several European Federation Working Groups are provided below.

WPSA European Working Group News

WG2

2021 espn

The Italian Branch is working on organising the 23rd edition of the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) which will be held at the Palacongressi of Rimini (Italy) from 5 to 8 September, 2022. The city of Rimini, is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition, and the modern as well as eco-friendly Venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world will be joining together to explore the past, share the present. and to help forge the future of poultry meat science. Additional details are available at the Symposia website: https://www.espn2022.eu/

WG3

Breeding and Genetics

The 12th symposium on Breeding and Genetics is being planned. It will take place in Hannover, 8-10 November 2022, and will be hosted by the German Branch. We would be pleased if you save this date and plan your participation. Further information will follow in due course.

Steffen Weigend, Chairman of the European Federations Working Group 3

WG4

Quality of Eggs and Egg Products

Due to the postponement of the World’s Poultry Congress caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, the WG4 meeting has been re-scheduled to take place during WPC2021 in August 2021, in Paris. Members who want to suggest topics to be discussed are more than welcome and can send their suggestions to the Chairpersons (; ).

WG5

Poultry Meat Quality

2021 Eggmeat logo EMQ

The next ‘XXV European Symposium on the Quality of Poultry Meat’ conjointly held with the ‘XIX European Symposium on the Quality of Eggs and Egg Products’ will be held between June 8 to 10, 2022 in Kraków, Poland (see website for further information).

The next WG5 member meeting will be held during the Paris World's Poultry Congress in August 2021.

Massimiliano Petracci, Secretary Italian Branch of WPSA

WG6

Incubation and Fertility Research Group (IFRG)

Due to the spread of the Covid-19 virus, which has created lots of uncertainty for traveling, WG6 (IFRG) has postponed its 2020 meeting and has rescheduled it for October 14-15, 2021 at the Holiday Inn in Leiden, The Netherlands. For more information see the website.

Ampai Nangsuay, Secretary WG6


Asia Pacific Federation

WPSA Asian-Pacific Working Group News

A/P WG3

Ratites

There will be Ratite Research Sessions during the upcoming World Poultry Congress in Paris, France from 8-12 August 2021. Please send any suggestions for contributions and topics to .

Researchers involved in research on any Ratites (ostriches, emus, rheas, cassowaries or kiwis) are asked to contact the Ratite Group. Please send an email to .

Anel Engelbrecht, Chair

 

7th Mediterranean Poulty Summit

2021 7mpsDue to the current health situation and the uncertainty generated by the covid-19, the organizing Committees of the 7th Mediterranean Poultry Summit have decided to postpone again the event until October 6-8, 2021.

This difficult and sad decision is taken after a first postponement. At that time, we thought that the 6-month period contemplated for carrying out the MPS was enough time for the health situation to be controlled throughout the world. However, the world situation and the restrictions on capacity indoors suggest that a new postponement is the best option.

I hope the situation changes in one year and we can meet again face to face.

Thank you for your patience and support.

Warmest regards,

Carlos Garcés Narro

Details for the conference are shown on the website summit’s website: www.mpn-wpsa.org.

 

World's Poultry Science Journal

From 2020 the World’s Poultry Science Journal will be published by Taylor & Francis. If you have requested an online subscription as part of your membership, you have received an email from Taylor & Francis with instructions how to access WPSJ online from the new website www.tandfonline.com/TWPS. Please ensure that you add '@tandfonline.com' to your safe senders list to ensure these types of emails are not sent to your spam folder or blocked by your service provider. Should you have any questions about your online access please contact ”.

Upcoming articles

Articles in upcoming Journal(s)

  • Shu-Biao Wu- Optimisation of dietary energy utilisation for poultry – a literature review
  • Peter Selle - Addressing the shortfalls of sorghum as a feed grain for chicken-meat production
  • Broom - Evidence-based consideration of dietary ‘alternatives’ to anticoccidial drugs to help control poultry coccidial infections
  • Rao Abbas - Avian Cryptosporidiosis and its zoonotic significance in Asia
  • Sencer Buzrul - High hydrostatic pressure applications on liquid whole egg
  • Muhammad Javed - Effects of ethanol on health and performance of poultry
  • Dragana Ljubojević Pelić - The epidemiological significance of duck meat as a source of Salmonella spp. A Review
  • Peter Idowu - Current status and intervention of South Africa chicken production- A review
  • Awad - Prebiotics supplementation: an effective approach to mitigate the detrimental effects of heat stress in broiler chickens
  • Uyanga - Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and poultry production: Emerging issues in African countries

Summaries

Optimisation of dietary energy utilisation for poultry – a literature review

S. MUSIGWA, N. MORGAN, R.A. SWICK, P. COZANNET and S.-B. WU

Feed energy is an important production factor in poultry, representing 75% of the total cost of feed. Therefore, maximising energy digestion and utilisation is essential for cost-effectiveness and sustainability in poultry production. Consequently, accurate energy evaluation of raw material and animal requirements for energy is valuable for precision feeding and optimised benefits in growing chickens. Two key strategies to enhance the utilisation of energy from feed ingredients are the use of exogenous enzymes, such as carbohydrases, and accurate energy requirement prediction. Exogenous carbohydrases can enhance nutrient digestion and absorption, especially in diets with viscous ingredients, in which carbohydrases can enhance the digestibility of saturated fat and protein, by 33% and 3%, respectively, and about 4% energy utilisation. This can improve not only energy utilisation, but also gut health by reducing nutrient flow into the hindgut, as the presence of undigested nutrients fuels pathogenic bacteria proliferation. Moreover, accurate energy bioassays are required to provide values of dietary energy and true availability of energy to the birds. Currently, metabolisable energy (ME) systems are commonly used to evaluate poultry energetics. However, ME does not represent the total energy available to the birds, as it cannot measure the proportion of dietary energy that is lost as heat during feed ingestion, absorption and metabolism. In fact, the ME system can underestimate energy provided by fat by 13% and overestimate energy from proteins by 20% in chicken feeds. As net energy (NE)/ME ratio can vary from 59% to 77% depending on dietary composition, the NE systems are suggested as alternative, more accurate energy measurement methods, as they provide energy values corrected for heat increment. This paper reviews energy sources for poultry and addresses the potential to use NE measurements as a tool to evaluate the ability of feeds and feed additives to improve the exploitation of energy utilisation.

Addressing the shortfalls of sorghum as a feed grain for chicken-meat production

P.H. SELLE, R.J. HUGHES, I.D. GODWIN, A. KHODDAMI, P.V. CHRYSTAL and S. YUN LIU

Global chicken-meat production is projected to expand substantially in coming decades to meet demand. Given the drought tolerant properties of sorghum, coupled with the challenges of climate change, the use of sorghum as a feed grain for broiler chickens could markedly increase as, presently, the use of sorghum for this indication is limited. A mean crude protein concentration of 92.9 g/kg from a survey of 33 sorghum samples found an average kafirin concentration, the dominant protein fraction, of 48.2 g/kg, or 52%. As discussed, selection of grain sorghums with reduced kafirin concentrations and/or modified properties and reduced levels of phenolic compounds may largely address the shortfalls and enhance the quality of sorghum as a feed grain for chicken-meat production. If so, this should advantage energy utilisation and growth performance in broiler chickens offered sorghum-based diets. In this event, the acceptance of sorghum by chicken-meat producers would accelerate and the potential increase in sorghum usage realised.

Evidence-based consideration of dietary ‘alternatives’ to anticoccidial drugs to help control poultry coccidial infections

L.J. BROOM

Coccidiosis remains a major disease and economic challenge for the global poultry industry. Coccidiosis in chickens is caused by seven Eimeria species that target specific regions of the gastrointestinal tract and cause malabsorptive or haemorrhagic disease. These Eimeria species infect segment-specific epithelial cells and thus need to navigate the host’s indigenous microbiome and intestinal defences to establish an infection and cause disease. Good husbandry practices, prophylactic use of anticoccidial drugs and/or live parasite vaccination have been the primary control measures employed but there are challenges with vaccination and growing constraints on anticoccidial drug use. This review, therefore, considers available information on the key steps of the infection process, notable microbiome- or host-related changes occurring, and the (potential) influence of dietary ‘alternatives’ to anticoccidial drugs. There is good available evidence to indicate that some phytogenics, prebiotics, probiotics, betaine, n-3 fatty acids, as well as carbohydrase enzymes and anti-IL-10 antibodies, can (beneficially) modulate at least some of these features in coccidiosis-specific challenge studies. As a minimum, these anticoccidial drug ‘alternatives’ could support the establishment of a desirable host microbiome and optimum immune system development. It is important to better understand the potential of these ‘alternatives’ in commercial production and how they can complement, or reduce, the use of anticoccidial drugs.

Avian Cryptosporidiosis and its zoonotic significance in Asia

T. ZAHEER, M. IMRAN, R. ZAHID ABBAS, I. ZAHEER and M.A. MALIK

Cryptosporidium is regarded as one of the neglected, zoonotic, food and water-borne protozoal pathogens. Cryptosporidium species (C.) have been reported from more than 30 species of domestic, wild and captive birds. Human interaction with birds may cause zoonotic spread of Cryptosporidium spp., leading to high morbidities and even mortalities in both immune-competent and immune-compromised individuals. The research data from 16 Asian countries indicate highly variable prevalence of avian cryptosporidiosis ranging 8-35% approximately. The data on human cryptosporidiosis outbreak cases in the US during 2009-2017 has shown an increase of 12.8% per annum. A similar or even worse trend may be expected in developing nations. Based on critical analysis of current millennial data (2000-2019) from Asia, the reported zoonotic prevalence of cryptosporidiosis was approximately 1.5-7, 5.2, 8.3, 8.5, 9-20, 11, ~11, 11.8 and 38.25% in Iran, Malaysia, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, China, Lebanon, India and Egypt, respectively. Research on metagenomics and eco-biology of Cryptosporidium is providing valuable insights into potential vaccine candidates against the disease globally. Strict biosecurity, disinfection, filtration, hand sanitization and overall adequate hygienic measures can effectively prevent infection with the hardy cryptosporidial oocysts at commercial and household levels. The bottle-necks for Cryptosporidium spread in birds and humans need to be identified and adequately addressed. The purpose of this review is to highlight avian cryptosporidiosis including epidemiology, transmission dynamics, associated risk factors and their prevention, diagnostics with streamlined efforts in strengthening health care surveillance systems and therapeutics, along with its zoonotic impact across the Asian continent.

High hydrostatic pressure applications on liquid whole egg

S. BUZRUL

High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment at the pressure and temperature range of 300-450 MPa and 0-50°C for up to 30 min can be used successfully to inactivate several bacteria in liquid whole egg (LWE). On the other hand, in order to avoid egg protein coagulation, pressure levels ≤ 300 MPa and temperature levels ≤ 20°C should be selected and holding times ≤ 5 min are desirable for commercial HHP application. However, these conditions are not suitable for pasteurizing LWE. Therefore, antimicrobial agents such as nisin, in combination with HHP or successive use of HHP with heat or other non-thermal methods such as pulsed electric field or ultrasound have been tried for maximum microbial inactivation with minimum changes in physical, chemical and functional properties of LWE. This review compiles the studies on HHP and LWE. While microbial inactivation by HHP and inactivation kinetics is the main focus, the impact of HHP on functional properties of LWE is also discussed.

Effects of ethanol on health and performance of poultry

M.T. MUNIR, M.T. JAVED, A. REHMAN and J.D. REYES REYES

Birds ingest ethanol when farmers feed it to treat mild respiratory infections and to improve the feed conversion ratio (FCR) or when birds are exposed to ethanol as avian models in alcohol-related studies. The literature reviewed indicates that feed intake is not influenced when ethanol is offered at < 1% in feed and < 5% in drinking water. However, after ingestion of ethanol at 2 ml/day (40% in drinking water), birds had 5% lower weight gain that continued to decrease up to 21% when the dose rate was increased to 6 ml/day. At more concentrated doses (95%), even 1 ml of ingestion per day caused haemorrhagic lesions throughout the gastrointestinal tract of chicks, causing about a 40% reduction in feed intake and up to 70% reduction in weight gain. Ethanol ingestion can increase feed conversion ratio in birds up to four times compared to that of the control, in a dose-dependent manner. Physiological and histopathological studies have shown that ethanol harms the organs of the immune system, brain, blood forming tissues, gastrointestinal tract and other internal organs of birds, making it an important health and welfare risk. Experimental studies using avian models have also shown that pre-hatch exposure of embryos to ethanol can cause developmental and post-hatch growth retardation. This review article is intended to help decision-makers with implementing the guidelines for avoiding this misuse of alcohol with poultry, and researchers to identify low dose effects of ethanol on performance and avian model-related parameters.

The epidemiological significance of duck meat as a source of Salmonella spp. A Review

D. LJUBOJEVIĆ PELIĆ, S. VIDAKOVIĆ, M. PELIĆ, M. ŽIVKOV BALOŠ and D. MILANOV

Foodborne transmission of Salmonella spp. from contaminated duck meat has been recognized as an important hazard for human health in the past few decades and pathogenic strains of Salmonella spp. have long been considered as serious zoonotic hazards. The nutritional quality is the main reason for the fact that duck meat is very attractive for consumers worldwide, so measures to preserve the safety of duck meat are very important. Duck meat has received little attention in epidemiological studies, but undoubtedly the consumption of contaminated duck meat poses a high risk of foodborne disease just like other types of poultry meat and reports showed that 2% of all foodborne outbreaks was associated with consumption of duck meat. Furthermore, some results showed that contamination of duck meat with Salmonella spp. was 29.9% and was the highest in comparison with chicken (5%), turkey (5%) as well as meat of other poultry species. Prevalence of Salmonella spp. on duck farms in different countries significantly varied with time, ranging from 3.3% to 66.7%. The widespread use of antibiotics could be a significant cause in the development and transmission of resistance determinants from duck to humans via the food chain. The relationship between duck meat and the occurrence of salmonellosis in humans, mainly due to the lack of proper regulations, is reviewed in the present paper. The need for regular control of the presence of Salmonella in ducks, their environment and duck meat is highlighted. Continuous monitoring and reporting on incidents in the future should improve the current regulations.

Current status and intervention of South Africa chicken production: – A review

P.A. IDOWU, O. ZISHIRI, K.A. NEPHAWE and B. MTILENI

Poultry production has gained in importance in South Africa due to its acceptability, consumption and demand across the nation. Poultry products are a major source of protein and an important means of income. This review paper assesses the current status, constraints and intervention of indigenous chickens. Since the inception of the South Africa Poultry Association (SAPA) in the early 1900s, indigenous chicken breeds have taken a significant role in meeting nutritional and economical needs of consumers and poultry farmers. Several studies have shown that indigenous chicken breeds have been widely embraced for breeding programs with a high survival rate across the country. Indigenous chicken weight at maturity ranges from 2.5 kg to 3.5 kg depending on breed and these breeds possess different productive traits capacity. In recent years, use of indigenous chicken breeds has advanced from backyard practices to commercial operations. Studies have shown that the genetic capacity of indigenous chicken breeds varies. Naked Neck breed and Potchefstroom Kooekok had 65% and 31.4% level of heterozygosity, respectively, using mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite tools. Nevertheless, indigenous poultry are still confronted with some challenges such as unavailability of quality feed ingredients, ineffective marketing strategies, insufficient supply of quality water, disease occurrence and mortality among others. Suggested solutions to these challenges are development of policy that favours the poultry industry and farmers, well-structured supply of feed ingredients, proper housing and intervention of the SAPA.

Prebiotics supplementation: an effective approach to mitigate the detrimental effects of heat stress in broiler chickens

E.A. AWAD, I. ZULKIFLI, S.K. RAMIAH, E.S. KHALIL and M.E. ABDALLH

As a consequence of global warming and food security issues, heat stress has become an emerging problem. Heat stress causes huge economic losses in the broiler industry that negatively affects the production performance of chickens. Therefore, a variety of strategies have been examined for mitigating the heat stress problem. Among these strategies, the use of prebiotics has received increasing interest due to the beneficial effects of prebiotics on the health and production of heat-stressed broilers. The evidence from existing studies suggests that prebiotics can mitigate the negative effects of heat stress on broiler chickens by benefiting the intestinal microbiota, gut morphology, oxidative status, physiological stress response and subsequently growth performance of broiler chickens. For instance, prebiotics given to heat-stressed broilers at a dose as low as 0.025% have been shown to improve the feed intake, body weight gain and feed efficiency by 7.5, 9.9 and 2.3%, respectively. This review summarises the recent findings on prebiotics as an effective approach to improve the well-being, health and growth performance of broilers under heat stress conditions.

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and Poultry Production: Emerging issues in African Countries

V.A. UYANGA, O.M. ONAGBESAN, C.F.I. ONWUKA, E. BABAJIDE and H. LIN

The occurrence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which was first reported in Wuhan, Hubei province of China in December 2019, has now spread to all continents – including Africa. The coronaviruses, which are a family of ribonucleic acid viruses, circulate in both mammals and birds. The COVID-19 virus has been suggested to emanate from wildlife with the likelihood of zoonotic transfer to humans to establish infection. The uncertainty surrounding COVID-19 virus transmission has created significant concern for human-animal interactions, such as the possibility of infected humans transmitting the virus to animals and vice versa. With the escalation of COVID-19 virus across the globe, several measures including social distancing and self-isolation, have been established to ensure human safety and limit the risk of transmission. Emphasis is placed on global readiness and preparation of the health care systems and personnel; however, concerns are emanating on matters such as food security and the effects of global lock downs on the agricultural sector, including the poultry industries. In most African countries, where poultry production serves multi-faceted purposes including nutrition, income generation and security, containment of production operations would result in major economic crisis and food shortages due to the ensuing fluctuation in demand and supply. This generates interesting insights and knowledge gaps on the consequences of the COVID-19 outbreak on poultry production. With African countries confronting significant socioeconomic obstacles, it is important to devise measures that would assist in improving nutrition and food security in a manner that ensures the containment of the coronavirus. This review seeks to call attention to the impacts of COVID-19 on poultry production in African countries, and the strategies that should be adopted to assist in sustaining farm productivity, protect farm personnel, and strengthen biosafety for enhanced food security amid this global pandemic.

Branch News

France

The officers of the branch’s board met by video conference on 25 September 2020. The next meeting will take place in December 2020. See http://wpsa.fr/qui-sommes-nous/conseil-administration

The 2021 general assembly of WPSA-France will take place online 18 March 2021, during a scientific session called ‘WPSA Thursday’ dedicated to the topic ‘Resilience of the poultry production chain following one year of COVID-19’.

The Branch renews its call to all members for their participation in WPC2021 in Paris on 8-12 August 2021, and for the preparation for this event, which will also mark the centenary of WPSAs World Poultry Congresses.

Christophe Bostvironnois, President, and Michel Duclos, secretary WPSA France 

Germany

Due to the ongoing pandemic, we will hold our annual Spring Conference for the German Branch in a digital format on March 19, 2021. Please make a note of this on your calendar.

The XII European Symposium on Poultry Genetics is being planned for Hannover, 08 – 11, 2022. Information will follow.

Inga Tiemann, Secretary, Germany Branch

Italy

2020 fier avicolaThe next annual national meeting will be organized in conjunction with the 2021 edition of FIERAVICOLA which will be held at the Rimini Expo Centre from 4 to 6 May. General information on the International Poultry Exhibition is available on the website: https://www.fieravicola.com/en/.

The Italian Branch will host the 23rd edition of European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) which will be held at the Palacongressi of Rimini (Italy) from 5 to 8 September, 2022. The city of Rimini, is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly Venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and helping to forge the future of poultry meat science. More details are already available at the Symposia website: https://www.espn2022.eu/.

2022 ESPN logo

Massimiliano Petracci, Secretary, Italian Branch of WPSA

Japan

The 2021 Spring Meeting of the Japan Poultry Science Association (JPSA) will be held in online (web) style. All activities during the meeting, including presentations of original research findings, a general meeting, and the council meeting, will be organised on the web at the end of March. Details will be announced soon on the JPSA web site (https://jpn-psa.jp/). In the meantime, registration for the presentations of original research findings will be started at the beginning of January 2021, and the deadline will be January 26th, 2021. The details for the registration will also be informed via the JPSA web site.

The Journal of Poultry Science (JPS - the official journal of JPSA, IF: 0.880), the official scientific journal published by JPSA, became a member of PubMed Central (PMC), and articles published in the journal can now be accessed through the PubMed search engine. We welcome the contribution of original research articles and reviews to the JPS using the following web site: https://jpn-psa.jp/en/jps-en/. Free access to download the full-published articles in JPS is available on J-Stage (https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/browse/jpsa), which provides an excellent opportunity for all to access the published articles.

JPSA would like to contribute not only to poultry science in Japan, but all over the world by enhancing activities with members from other countries. Thus, JPSA has a membership category for foreign citizens residing abroad as ‘Special International Member’. The page charges for publishing their papers in the JPS will be set at the regular membership price. JPSA welcomes new members from all over the world. Please visit the JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/?lang=en) for further information.

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a tough situation in the world, but JPSA hopes things will get better soon. Please take good care of yourself!

Naoki Goto, Secretary of WPSA Japan Branch

Russia

Scientific communication with industry: The VNITIP Federal Scientific Centre of the Russian Science Academy in Serguiev Posad, Moscow Region, recognises the importance of scientific communication with the industry and has a programme to encourage this effort. Every year more than 1000 experts from Russia and abroad attend lectures from leading scientists in poultry industry areas, exchange experiences and discuss innovations from local and foreign poultry science efforts in Ptitsegrad. All are welcome to attend the courses in Serguiev Posad.

Tatiana Vasilieva, Secretary

United Kingdom

New Opportunity: The GD Rosen Academic Career Advancement Award

The UK branch is pleased to announce a new Academic Career Advancement Award in memory of Professor Gordon D Rosen. Gordon contributed a highly logical and very descriptive approach to animal nutrition from the 1960s through to just a few years before his death in 2015. A full obituary for him is available in volume 71 of World’s Poultry Science Journal. He was an inspirational person whose curiosity and gently framed yet penetrating questions made him a legend. There is a generation of scientists influenced by his presence – always in the front row – of scientific meetings, and now his wife Vanda would like to encourage other scientists to develop their own inquisitiveness through this new award.

The GD Rosen Academic Career Advancement Award provides £2000 each year to fund an academic adventure. With this aim, the award is open in nature, while particularly encouraging people to become multidisciplinary in their approach to research. The award is open to UK branch members who are within their early career spanning from 2 years to 5 years post PhD viva. Examples of proposals might include a request to attend an academic conference (particularly one outside your core field), support for an educational tour of another country or global region, support to visit another institution to learn a new technique or approach, or support to publish a major research output in a journal requiring publication fees.

Proposal forms and conditions of the GD Rosen Award can be found on the WPSA-UK website.

Deadline for applications: 30th January 2021

 

March 2020 Newsletter

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
Volume 50, March 2020  Newsletter Editor: Dr G.B. Havenstein,  

 

2020 wpc  

World's Poultry Congres 2020

16-20 August, Paris, France

Scholarship Awards

During the XXVI World’s Poultry Congress in Paris, France in 2020 Scholarship Awards for respectively the WPSA Paul B. Siegel Research Award and the WPSA Education Award are going to be presented. Deadline for submissions was 1st March 2020.
To show how awards are utilized, those nominated must, if successful, undertake to present a report of their work at the next World’s Poultry Congress following the one at which the award was made.

International Poultry Hall of Fame

Selection of candidates for the International Poultry Hall of Fame have been finalised. The new inductees will be presented during the Opening Ceremony.

Cliff D. Carpenter International Essay Competition

At the latest Board meeting, held during the Poultry Science Association (PSA) meeting in Montréal, Canada, it was decided to start the Cliff D. Carpenter International Essay competition.
Five travel awards ($2000 each) will be made available on a competitive basis to full time graduate students for attendance at the XXVI World’s Poultry Congress in Paris, France, 16-20 August 2020. The original essay of up to 2000 words should address the topic ‘The possible role of the World’s Poultry Science Association in education’. The 5 winners should come from different continents, they have to be a member in 2019 and must be between the ages of 18-30.
The applications for the International Cliff D. Carpenter Essay competition are currently being evaluated.

Nominating Advisory Committee (NAC)

Preparations are underway for the formation of a Nominating Advisory Committee (NAC), which committee is in charge of seeking candidates for the WPSA Board 2020-2024. The NAC will be chaired by Dr Mamduh Sifri. Branches and members can propose candidates for the offices of President, five Vice-Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer.
Further information can be found in the WPSA Constitution and By-laws (Constitution article IV-5 and By-Laws article II-8 through 11).

Council Meeting

During the Council meeting the city and country for the next World’s Poultry Congress in 2024 will be selected. The candidate cities are: Cape Town proposed by the South Africa branch and Toronto proposed by the Canada, Mexico and USA branches.
Also a new Board will be selected during the Council Meeting. Each Branch, in good financial standing, is eligible to vote. The number of votes per branch depends on the number of members on December 1st of the year preceding the vote (see the Constutition and By-Laws).
All members are invited to attend the Council Meeting.

Updates on the above mentioned topics will be publsihed on the WPSA website under the heading !! WPC2020 !!.

   

Registration for WPC2020

Registration for WPC2020 are open. Click here for details.

 

Executive Committee

Secretary's Report

mulder roel

World’s Poultry Congress, Palais de Congrès, August 16 – 20, 2020, Paris, France

Information on the programme of WPC2020 can be found on www.wpcparis2020.com
Preparations are underway for the Council meeting during the next WPC.
During the Council meeting the city and country for the next World’s Poultry Congress in 2024 will be selected. The candidate cities are: Cape Town proposed by the South Africa branch and Toronto proposed by the Canada, Mexico and USA branches.
Selection of candidates for the International Poultry Hall of Fame have been finalised. The applications for the International Cliff D. Carpenter Essay competition are currently being evaluated.
Deadlines for application for the WPSA Paul B. Siegel Research Award and the WPSA Education Award are approaching.
The Nominating Advisory Committee (NAS), which is in charge of seeking candidates for WPSA’s 2020-2024 Board of Directors has started its activities. Branches and members can now propose candidates for the 2020-2024 Board of directors.

WPSA presence at exhibitions and conferences

WPSA leadership members were present at IPPE, Atlanta, USA, during January 2020. Other events that will have WPSA presence include VIV MEA, Abu Dhabi, UAE and Victam Asia, and Animal Health and Nutrition, Bangkok, Thailand, as well as the Mediterranean Poultry Summit, 25-27 March 2020, Cordoba, Spain. Information on the programme for the Mediterranean Summit can be found on www.mpn-wpsa.org/spain2020 and www.wpsa.com 
The 1st Poultry Nutrition symposium 25-26 March 2020 in Bangkok, Thailand has been postponed because of the Covid-19 virus.
During the above listed symposia and conferences, promotional materials for WPSA, the World’s Poultry Science Journal, WPC 2020 in Paris, France, and other upcoming conferences and events will be on display.
WPSA members and any other interested individuals are invited to attend the above events where they meet many other WPSA members and leadership representatives.

WPSA World’s Poultry Science Journal

The March 2020 issue of the World’s Poultry Science Journal, is being hosted and produced by Taylor & Francis Publishers, and is on track.

WPSA programmes

WPSA has several programmes to support members and branches. Details on the Travel Grant programmes, the Speakers’ Bureau programme, and on proposals for Branch Development can be found on the WPSA website. Criteria for eligibility for these programmes are published together with the (different) deadlines for the individual programmes. Please follow the instructions, as inaccurate, incomplete and late applications have to be rejected.

Cooperation with the organization on World Veterinary Education in Production Animal Health (WVEPAH)

The WVEPAH, a non-profit organization organises training courses on poultry (for 3 à 4 weeks) in several countries. Additional details are provided on www.wvepah.org. All joint activities with WVEPAH will also be announced on our WPSA website and in the WPS Journal.

Dr Roel Mulder, General Secretary

Treasurer's Report

bradley francine new

Since my last report, I had the pleasure of attending the International Production and Processing Exposition (IPPE) in Atlanta, Georgia. IPPE redesigned two of the exhibition floors this year and WPSA was lucky to be given a booth near the extremely popular food court. The proximity to food, plus the neighbouring booths of other scientific societies and institutions, brought us excellent foot traffic. The other members of the Executive Committee (EC): Drs. Ning Yang, Roel Mulder, and Bob Buresh, joined me in the booth. We greeted WPSA members, officers, as well as financial supporters of our Journal, from around the globe.
The EC held a productive meeting in Atlanta and discussed time sensitive topics, including WPC2020-Paris. We were delighted to learn of the large number of applications for the Young Scientist Programme in Paris. The EC decided that in addition to the support already pledged by the global body, WPSA would match the French Branch in funding an additional 10 Young Scientists.

I am pleased to report that I have forwarded all of the 2019 financial records and tax information to WPSA’s Certified Public Accountant (CPA). I will be working with the CPA and his staff in the coming months to finalise the WPSA tax returns.

As I close this report, I will start packing for a USA west coast trade association meeting in Hawaii. At that event I coordinated the programmes for the poultry students, and their programmes are generously sponsored by the United States Branch of WPSA.

Dr Francine Bradley, Treasurer

26th World's Poultry Congress

Palais de Congrès,

August 16-20, 2020, Paris, France

20WPC blocmarque blocdates

It is with great pleasure that the French branch of WPSA invites you to attend the 26th World Poultry Congress in Paris, from 16-20 August 2020. We have prepared an attractive Congress for the benefit of the large number of participants that are coming from all over the world. The scientific programme will be highly interactive and interdisciplinary, with the objective of ‘Integrating knowledge for sustainable and diversified poultry productions’. The Mediterranean and African Poultry Networks will hold specific sessions, and a symposium will take place under the auspices of FAO. As usual for a WPC, Youth and Young Scientist programmes will be held.

Exhibition and sponsoring: the programme includes an exhibition that allows companies to display their company information and products within the Congress Centre, and the Congress programme will include a number of technical symposia as well.

Registration: We received nearly 1000 early bird registrations before December 31st, 2019. Registration will continue at the regular price until March 31st, 2020, and at an increased price thereafter.

Abstracts: The submission of abstracts closed on January 5th, 2020. More than 1400 abstracts were received and are currently under evaluation. Acceptance results and notifications for the abstracts are expected to occur sometime during March 2020.

Sessions and Invited speakers: Sessions will last from Sunday afternoon, 16th of August, to Thursday morning, the 20th of August. Renowned speakers from all over the world will be involved in both the plenary lectures and in the parallel sessions. Their addresses have been assigned to one of the following topic sessions: Nutrition, Breeding and Genetics, Egg Quality, Poultry Meat Quality, Reproduction, Hygiene and Pathology, Poultry Welfare and Management, Physiology, Education and Information, Waterfowl, and Turkeys. For detailed information about the WPC registration and programme, see the Congresses website: http://www.wpcparis2020.com/.

Christophe Bostvironnois, President French Branch
Michael Duclos, Secretary, French Branch
Michèle Tixier Boichard, WPC2020, Programme Coordinator

 

Newly Compiled List of Poultry Educational Resources

In her role as one of the Vice Presidents of the WPSA, Julie Roberts from the Australian Branch has compiled a list of Poultry Educational Resources which are available free of charge via the internet. Some of the web sites listed also have resources for sale. However, the focus of this list is resources which are free and therefore available to all members.

The list is posted on the WPSA website, and will always be a ‘work in progress’ as some resources become available and added, or others, if they are out of date or no longer available, will be removed from the internet list.

If members are aware of other resources that are available that could be added to the list, please contact Mrs Dorien Velner at the main office by email: with the title of the resource, how to access it and a short description.

All entries will be checked on a regular basis to make sure that they continue to be available, however if you find any irregularities, please contact us at

 

European Federation

The next European Poultry Conference will be held in Valencia, Spain in 2022.

The European Federation has numerous conferences planned between now and on into 2021. A list of most of our upcoming conferences may be found on the WPSA Calendar at www.wpsa.com
News from several European Federation Working Groups are provided below.

WPSA European Working Group News

WG2

2021 espnThe Italian Branch will host the 23rd edition of European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) which will be held at the Palacongressi of Rimini (Italy) from September 20-23, 2021. The city of Rimini, is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and helping to forge the future of poultry meat science. More details are already available at the symposium website: https://www.espn2021.eu/.

WG3

Breeding and Genetics

The 11th European Symposium on Poultry Genetics was held in Prague from 23 to 25 October 2019. The symposium was hosted by the Czech branch of WPSA and organised together with Working Group 3 'Breeding and Genetics' of the European Federation of WPSA. The 3-day symposium was very well attended, and 141 scientists from 30 countries participated. The scientific programme included sessions on new breeding technologies, genomic selection, current topics on dual-purpose chickens, genetic diversity, microbiota, new breeding targets for poultry species and the breeding of other bird species. A total of 25 invited speakers presented the latest results of their current research, which were discussed in various ways. Furthermore, scientists presented their work in 46 posters.
A particular highlight of the Symposium was a special session in which four young scientists had the opportunity to present their work in a short oral presentation. Working Group 3 endeavours to support young scientists in this way by covering the registration fees for the selected presenters. The symposium took place in a very pleasant and productive atmosphere and gave the participants the opportunity for an intensive exchange of ideas in a variety of ways. On behalf of the working group, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all participants, colleagues and helpers involved in preparing the symposium as well as our sponsors, who made a significant contribution to the success of the symposium.

The 12th symposium is already being planned. It will take place in Hannover from 26 - 28 October 2021, and will be hosted by the German Branch. We would be pleased if you saved this date and planned your participation. Further information will follow in due course.

Steffen Weigend, Chairman of the European Federations Working Group 3

WG5

Poultry Meat Quality

2021 Eggmeat logo EMQ

The XXV European Symposium on the Quality of Poultry Meat will be conjointly held with the XIX European Symposium on the Quality of Eggs and Egg Products from June 21 to 23, 2021, in Kraków, Poland. Please visit http://www.eggmeat2021.com/ to keep yourself updated. Special reduced registration fees will be available for WPSA members and students. We will look forward to seeing many of you there. Prominent invited speakers from American and European Institutions will address emerging issues on poultry meat and egg production. A new website will be developed and registration information will be provided in the near future.

Most WG5 members will also be participating in the 2020 World's Poultry Congress in Paris, France on August 16-20, and the scientific programme of the two parallel sessions dealing with 'Meat Quality' is almost defined under supervision of the WG5 group in connection with the Scientific Committee of which WG5 chairperson is a part. During the Paris Congress, a meeting of Working Group 5 has also been planned during WPC2020, and it will take place on Wednesday, August 19th. See the Congress Programme for the meeting time and location.


Asia Pacific Federation

2020 apf poultry nutrition symposium

Postponing the Asia Pacific Federation (APF) Poultry Nutrition Symposium

Because of the COVID-19 (Corona Virus) outbreak, which is a great concern worldwide, travelling to mass gatherings can be a risk for travellers, including the spread of an infection.
After discussions with the Organising Committee of the APF Poultry Nutrition Symposium and the Thai Government, the President of the Asia Pacific Federation, Dr Sakchai Sriboonsue, has decided to postpone the meeting, which was scheduled for 25-26 March 2020 in Bangkok, Thailand, until further notice.

The Organising Committee would like to apologize for any inconvenience this causes to the sponsors and attendees.

WPSA Asian-Pacific Working Group News

A/P WG3

Ratites

The Ratite Working Group will hold a general meeting on the 18th of March at 10:00 on the Oudtshoorn Research Farm, Oudtshoorn, South Africa. All are welcome to attend.

The next meeting is scheduled to take place at the World Poultry Congress in Paris, France that is being held 16-20 August 2020. Please let us know if you are planning to attend the meeting and Congress, as well as any topics that you would like to have considered, by sending an email to .

Anel Engelbrecht, Chair

7th Mediterranean Poulty Summit

The Mediterranean Poultry Network will host the 7th Mediterranean Poultry Summit at the University of Cordoba in Cordoba, Spain, on March 25-27, 2020. Details for the conference are shown on the website summit’s website: www.mpn-wpsa.org. The Registration Deadline for the Summit is March 25 2020.

 

World's Poultry Science Journal

From 2020 the World’s Poultry Science Journal will be published by Taylor & Francis. If you have requested an online subscription as part of your membership, you have received an email from Taylor & Francis with instructions how to access WPSJ online from the new website www.tandfonline.com/TWPS. Please ensure that you add '@tandfonline.com' to your safe senders list to ensure these types of emails are not sent to your spam folder or blocked by your service provider. Should you have any questions about your online access please contact ”.

Upcoming articles

Articles in upcoming Journal(s)

  • M. Tixier-Boichard - From the jungle fowl to highly-performing chickens: are we reaching limits?
  • A. Salamon - The double-yolked egg: from the 'miracle of packaging' to nature's 'mistake'
  • L. Sarmiento-Franco - Do free-range systems have potential to improve broiler welfare in the tropics?
  • S.S. Elnesr - Impact of green tea (Camellia sinensis) and epigallocatechin gallate on poultry
  • O. Olgun - Evaluation of dietary presence or use of cadmium in poultry
  • S.U. Mahfuz - Role of certain mushrooms on growth performance and physiological responses in broiler chickens
  • T.R. Kannaki - Marek's disease: Time to review the emerging threat in Indian poultry
  • J.L. Angove - The avian maternal environment: exploring the physiological mechanisms driving progeny performance
  • J.-J. Chen - Chromolaena odorata as a potential feed additive bioresource to alleviate heat strss in chickens in the humid tropics
  • O. Olgun - Use of alfalfa meal in layer diets – a review
  • H. Hamadani - Characteristics of the Kashmir Anz geese breed
  • K.M. Hartcher - Genetic selection of broilers and welfare consequences: a review

Summaries

From the jungle fowl to highly-performing chickens: are we reaching limits?

M. TIXIER-BOICHARD

The cumulated effects of domestication and subsequent selection by humans have led to an impressive diversification of the chicken, at the phenotypic level as well as the genome level. In theory, selection may reach a plateau when all favourable alleles have reached fixation. Yet, current data in poultry show that selection response can still take place after 50 generations of selection or more. The mechanisms maintaining selection response in closed populations may involve recombination, mutation and epistatic interactions. Furthermore, the continuous addition of new selection criteria can delay the possible limit associated to single trait selection. Thus, selection response is mainly threatened by inbreeding which occurs as a consequence of a narrow genetic base and/or a poor management of genetic variability within the population. Biological limits are encountered when selection is degrading fitness traits to a point that the survival of individuals is affected. Biological limits induced by extreme performance can be by-passed by adapting the breeding programme, introducing new selection criteria, changing the management or developing remedial technologies. Extreme situations affecting bird welfare raise ethical issues. Lameness in broilers or spontaneous bone breakage in layers are painful and one may question whether such pain is justified by the human need for protein consumption. Regulations or market requirements may be set up to limit the performance at a level which is compatible with animal welfare, resulting in a voluntary limit to selection. Furthermore, highly performing animals need a very well controlled environment with high quality diets, which may divert food resources from humans and may not be sustainable. Breeding objectives have to integrate environmental impact and robustness towards the use of alternative feed sources, in addition to production level, product quality, health and welfare status.

The double-yolked egg: from the ‘miracle of packaging’ to nature’s ‘mistake’

A. SALAMON and J.P. KENT

Double-yolked (DY) eggs were mostly described in domestic prosocial species, and are rarely found in nature. It is estimated that 1-3% of domestic hen and duck eggs are DY.

DY eggs occur when two yolks are encapsulated in a single shell and therefore differ from SY eggs in their external and internal characteristics. In previous decades DY eggs were distinguished from SY eggs only by their external characteristics, and this proved to be wrong, as over 40% of DY eggs have similar external characteristics in terms of size and shape to SY eggs. The internal characteristics of DY eggs constrain their fertility. Yolks in DY eggs tend to be smaller, probably ovulated early and are thus immature, having a significant negative impact on their reproductive potential with lower fertility levels. Further, the presence of a second yolk facilitates additional albumen secretion with the size of each yolk determining the additional amount secreted. This creates a primacy effect, i.e. the first yolk in the oviduct could be fertilized, but the second may not be. The unique yolk and embryo positioning is associated with low hatchability. These factors reduce the reproductive potential of DY egg yolks individually or cumulatively. Thus the above supports the view that DY eggs are nature’s ‘mistake’ and are viewed here as an extreme end of a normal distribution of variation and is unlikely to evolve further in avian species. However, there is still potential for further non-invasive research using DY eggs, especially in studies of factors affecting fertility.

Do free-range systems have potential to improve broiler welfare in the tropics?

R. SÁNCHEZ-CASANOVA, L. SARMIENTO-FRANCO, C. PHILLIPS and Z. IDRUS

An insight into the impact of free-range systems on the main welfare problems for commercial-line broiler chicken production in tropical regions is provided. Much research has been conducted to mitigate the impact of conventional production systems on broilers welfare, but nearly all of these studies are based on the development of strategies to improve performance parameters in temperate regions, making it difficult to implement such approaches in tropical environments. Stocking density is one of the main housing variables that influences the birds’ development. Optimal stocking density ranges from 25 kg to 40 kg liveweight per m2, with no less than 1 m2 of outdoor area per bird in some cases, for a minimum of 8 hours of free-range access per day, according to welfare legislations in different jurisdictions worldwide. Several studies with commercial-line broiler chickens have shown that they are adapted to the environmental characteristics of tropical regions if temperature is below 30°C, relative humidity levels below 80% inside the housing and stocking density does not exceed 30 kg/m2. Therefore, Latin America has great potential for the implementation of free-range production system. The use of local resources, like forage plants for feed and natural materials with good thermal insulation properties for housing construction could be a good alternative to make this system feasible. C4 plants present in tropical ecosystems have a very high rate of water-use efficiency in temperatures between 30-35°C, which may increase the productivity of crops, fodder and pastures. Those plants are a good option to stimulate ranging in chickens, due to both their abilities as covering crop and fast growing. The review concludes that outdoor access has potential to improve broiler welfare in tropical regions, but it is still necessary to develop standards and regulations that ensure its proper functioning and, consequently, chickens’ welfare.

Impact of green tea (Camellia sinensis) and epigallocatechin gallate on poultry

M.E. ABD EL-HACK, S.S. ELNESR, M. ALAGAWANY, A. GADO, A.E. NORELDIN and A.A. GABR

Green tea is of interest due to its high content of pharmacologically active ingredients such as catechins, flavanols, flavadiols, flavonoids and phenolic acids. Green tea contains many polyphenolic compounds such as epicatechin, epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin, and epigallocatechin gallate. The inclusion of green tea as a feed additive has been shown to improve growth performance and overall health of poultry. Previous studies have shown different results in the rate of improvement in body weight (between 1-10%) with the use of different doses of green tea (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 and 3 mg/kg) in the diet. Using 1-2 mg green tea per kg in the broiler diet improved feed conversion ratio (FCR) by approximately 8%. Abdominal fat was decreased by 10-20% using 0.2-1.0% green tea extract in broiler diets. Improvements in egg production, egg mass and feed conversion values with inclusion rates of 1% green tea in feed, compared to a negative control, have been reported to be 5.6%, 6.8% and 7.8%, respectively. Green tea may improve the antioxidant status of poultry. Epigallocatechin gallate has been found to be over 100 times more effective in neutralising free radicals than vitamin C and 25 times more powerful than vitamin E.

Evaluation of dietary presence or use of cadmium in poultry

O.OLGUN, A.Ö. YILDIZ and A. ŞAHIN

Cadmium is a heavy metal and non-essential for animals. In practice, cadmium toxicity is quite rare in farm animals because the level of cadmium in commercial diets is very low. However, cadmium-contaminated feedstuffs in the diet may cause toxicity. The cadmium, which is absorbed from digestive system, accumulates in the body tissues, primarily kidney and liver, and causes metabolic and physiological inconveniences in the body. Hereby, economic losses occur due to the decrease in feed intake and egg production. It will cause mortality depending on the level and duration of exposure to cadmium. The toxic level of cadmium varies according to the bird species and their ages. Chickens are more sensitive to cadmium toxicity than quails. Lower dietary cadmium doses (<10 mg/kg) have positive effects on production performance and eggshell quality, but higher doses of cadmium (>10 mg/kg) cause economic losses due to worsening productive performance and eggshell quality in poultry. Dietary zinc, selenium, vitamins and plant extracts will help to eliminate the negative consequences of cadmium contamination in feedstuff. However, further studies are needed to determine the toxic level of cadmium, and the possible positive effects of cadmium on performance and product quality when used at lower doses in poultry.

Role of certain mushrooms on growth performance and physiological responses in broiler chickens

S.U. MAHFUZ, S.F. LONG and X.S. PIAO

Supplementing broiler diets with medicinal mushrooms is considered an effective alternative to prophylactic antibiotics. Feeding certain mushrooms may have beneficial effects on gut health in broilers, whereby trials have shown weight gain was increased about 5.2% when feeding 5% of the Hericium caput-medusae mushrooms in the diet. Both Salmonella spp. and E. coli numbers in the caecum were significantly lowered from 5.036 to 3.031 log10 CFU/g and from 5.405 to 4.759 log10 CFU/g when 50 g/kg or 30 g/kg of Flammulina velutipes mushrooms were included in feed, respectively, compared to an unsupplemented control group. Beneficial bacteria (Lactobacilli spp.) were found in significantly higher numbers (increased from 6.45 to 8.05 log10 CFU/g) and Bifidobacter spp. (increased from 6.28 to 7.77 log10 CFU/g of content) in the caecum of broilers fed 20 g/kg mushrooms (Agaricus biosporus) in feed. However, there is still disagreement in published articles on the dosages and mode of action of medicinal mushrooms in broilers. The following review covered the published trials investigating the uses of medicinal fungi on growth performance, meat quality and health status in broiler to date, and showed. that supplementation with medicinal fungi may have a role on the immunity, health and growth performance in broiler.

Marek’s disease: Time to review the emerging threat in Indian Poultry

T.R. KANNAKI and V. GOWTHAMAN

Marek’s disease (MD) is one of the re-emerging diseases in Indian poultry. MD outbreaks are reported from different parts of the country in spite of vaccination, causing major economic losses. Flock mortality of 10-40% was observed in vaccinated flocks during outbreaks, although MD is well controlled with vaccination. Almost 100% of the commercial poultry flocks are vaccinated at hatchery level. Bivalent (HVT+SB1 or HVT+301B/1) or monovalent (HVT) vaccines are used in India. In spite of the intensive vaccination practice, outbreaks are being reported from different parts of the world including India. MD virus (MDV) Indian field isolates from different outbreaks during last decade are categorised into virulent (vMDV) and very virulent (vvMDV) pathotypes based on different serotype 1 specific gene sequencing and in vivo pathotyping. The emergence of virulence in MDV is attributed to compromised bio-security, concurrent immunosuppressive diseases and vaccination failure. MD outbreaks in vaccinated flocks of Indian poultry flocks cause annual loss of approximately 4 crore Indian rupees. Country-wide surveillance and reporting of MD outbreaks and further characterization of the Indian field isolate should be taken as a priority. Reviewing the current vaccination strategy, and examining the need for the introduction of more effective vaccines that give better protection against the more virulent strains should be considered with equal importance along with improved bio-security measures, management practices and more effective control of immunosuppressive diseases.

The avian maternal environment: exploring the physiological mechanisms driving progeny performance

J.L. ANGOVE and R.E.A. FORDER

Environmental factors, both positive and negative, experienced by breeder hens during their reproductive life, can have a significant influence on the productive efficiency and health of their progeny. This is particularly important considering that commercial broilers spend a significant proportion of their life in ovo, and alterations to the in ovo environment can permanently ‘programme’ progeny endocrine pathways. The maternal environment is greatly influenced by factors, such as nutrition and stress, both of which play a significant role in the broiler breeder industry, due to feed restriction practices, ranging from 25-80% of the ad libitum intake. The effects of nutrition and stress on the maternal environment have been extensively investigated in mammalian literature, primarily focusing on the development and function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) in offspring, including exposure to the stress hormone cortisol. Disruption of the HPA axis can inadvertently disrupt other important endocrine pathways, involved in growth and metabolism, including the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor I axis (GH/IGF-I) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis (HPT). Any disruption or ‘reprogramming’ of the metabolic endocrine axes through maternal influences has been linked to variations in progeny performance, including growth rate and body composition. However, the underlying physiological mechanisms responsible for these phenotypic differences remain unclear, especially in poultry.

Chromolaena odorata as a potential feed additive bioresource to alleviate heat stress in chickens in the humid tropics

K.A. LARTEY, D.-J. KANG, Q.-H. ZHANG, C.-Q. SHI, F. YANG, H.-Y. LIN, R. GOONERATNE and J.-J. CHEN

Chromolaena odorata contains polyphenols and antioxidant enzymes that activate biology defence mechanisms and stress-sensing transcription factors to prevent oxidative damage and heat stress in chicken. Dietary inclusions of C. odorata leaf meal at 12%, and C. odorata crude flavonoids at 400 mg/kg/d exerted competitive exclusion to enhance gut eubiosis, humoral immunity, hypoglycaemia and metabolic functions, necessary to attenuate oxidative stress in chickens. Ethanol extract of the herbal plant at 25 – 400 µg/mL showed a strong antioxidant capacity in vitro, similar to 10- 80 µg/mL standard ascorbic acid. Chromomoric acid C- 1 from C. odorata methanol extract, at 10 µg also demonstrated anti-inflammatory potential by activating Nrf2 and suppressing NF-κB in a luciferase reporter assay at inhibition capacity (IC50) of 6.9 µM. These biological defence properties of the obnoxious weed have potential to maintain gut microbial homeostasis and gut integrity, enhance antioxidative physiologies for cellular oxidative balance, and mitigate oxidative damage required to alleviate heat stress. The invading nature of the plant in the humid tropics makes it a readily available and cheap bioresource. Hepatotoxic, mutagenic and cytotoxic evaluations suggest the aerial parts of the herbal plant is a safe bioresource for animal nutrition and sub-therapeutical uses.

Use of alfalfa meal in layer diets – a review

A.Ö. YILDIZ, E.T. ŞENTÜRK and O. OLGUN

Alfalfa meal is used in poultry diets because of its content of pigments and secondary metabolites. On average, alfalfa meal contains 17-20% crude protein, 1650 kcal/kg metabolisable energy, 20-25% crude cellulose, 1.50% calcium, 0.25% total phosphorus, 0.70% lysine, and 0.25% methionine, depending on the quality of the alfalfa meal. Alfalfa meal with a high content of beta carotene and xanthophyll is used to supplement poultry diets in order to obtain good yolk and skin pigmentation. In addition to producing good pigmentation, it is low in cholesterol because of the high cellulose content and anti-nutritional factors.

Although alfalfa meal is high in protein with moderate quality, its use is restricted because of the high cellulose content. The use of alfalfa meal in layer bird diets can reduce feed intake and egg production. On the other hand, it is very effective in reducing the cholesterol content of eggs and increasing the colour score of the yolk. The current recommendation is to restrict the use of alfalfa meal to 10% of the diet, although further research is needed on the use of additives to alfalfa-meal containing diets.

Characteristics of the Kashmir Anz geese breed

H. HAMADANI, A.A. KHAN and M.T. BANDAY

The local domestic geese breed of Kashmir Valley has now been registered as a recognized breed named ‘Kashmir Anz’, making it the first and the only recognized domestic geese breed in India as of now. Geese rearing in the Valley dates back to ancient times. They are reared for meat, eggs, and as a hobby in areas located around the water bodies. Kashmir Anz are cinnamon, white, and a mixture of cinnamon and white coloured geese with beak colour varying from black to yellow through all intermediates. Shanks are orange, and eyes are either grey or brown. Peculiarities like knob, dewlap and paunch is also present in some of these geese. Two Strains (or within breed types) of ‘Kashmir Anz’ breed include ‘Safed Anz’ and ‘Katchur Anz’. Sexual dimorphism on the basis of plumage and eye colour is absent. Vent sexing or vocalization method are the most accurate and practical methods of gender identification respectively. Adult body weight of the gander is 3.82 kg and that of the goose is 3.34 kg. The average body temperature, respiration rate and heart-rate is 40.05±0.15°C, 17.16±0.75 breaths min−1 and 60.57±5.09 beats min−1, respectively. The goose lays about 12 white-shelled eggs in a year, each weighing about 137 g on an average. Dressing percentage of a Kashmir Anz geese is 67.7%. The acceptability of its meat is good and significant proportion of consumers have rated it better than chicken meat as well as mutton in terms of appearance, texture, taste and overall acceptability.

Genetic selection of broilers and welfare consequences: a review

K.M. HARTCHER and H.K. LUM

The genetic selection of broilers over the past 60 years has focused narrowly and intensely on production traits, namely growth rate and feed efficiency. This has led to significant welfare problems in birds grown for meat, including leg disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and resulting high mortality rates, while the breeder birds are subjected to severe feed restriction. Bone problems such as bacterial chondronecrosis and tibia dyschondroplasia are prevalent, and recent studies have reported the prevalence of birds with moderate to severe gait impairment to be between 5.5 and 48.8%. Worldwide, over 66 billion broilers are slaughtered annually. This huge scale of meat chicken production means that welfare problems are widespread and are likely to increase in severity due to the increasing global human population, increasing demand for meat, and a continued focus on efficiency of production in the agricultural sector. The commercial broiler industry therefore represents some of the most serious animal welfare issues in agriculture. There is an urgent need to address these problems by making welfare traits high priorities in breeding programmes and integrating these with other breeding goals. Many studies recommend the use of slower-growing breeds that do not have the same welfare problems. Addressing these welfare issues is essential to improve bird welfare and for social acceptability and sustainability of the broiler industry worldwide.

 

Branch News

France

World's Poultry Congress 2020

20WPC blocmarque blocdates

The French branch is in the process of finalizing the World's Poultry Congress (WPC2020), that will take place at the Palais de Congrès in Paris on August, 16-20, 2020. The objective of the Congress is: ‘Integrating knowledge for sustainable and diversified poultry productions’. On days 1 and 4, plenary lectures will address global challenges. On day 2 and 3, parallel sessions will feature at least four multidisciplinary ‘object oriented’ sessions in the morning and up to seven specialised sessions in the afternoon. Several early sponsors are already supporting the event and further applications are welcome.

Abstract submission closed on January 5th, 2020 with the reception of 1400 abstracts, currently under evaluation. The organising committee received nearly 1000 early bird registrations by December 31st, 2019. Regular registrations will continue at the regular price through March 31st, 2020, and at la higher price after. See https://www.wpcparis2020.com for detailed information about registration and the programme for WPC2020.

Christophe Bostvironnois, President, and Michel Duclos, secretary WPSA FranceChristophe Bostvironnois, President, WPSA France 

Germany

The German Branch proudly presents the speakers for the Spring Conference of the German Branch, which will be held at the University of Rostock on March 10-11, 2020. Registration is open until March 1st, 2020, and can be made by replying to ).

The programme will include:
Michael Oste et al., Dummerstorf: P-FOWL: Effects of differential phosphorus supply for poultry.
Gürbüz Daş et al., Dummerstorf: Does a dual purpose genotype differ from meat and layer type genotypes in terms of response to experimental nematode infections?
Vivian Goerlich-Jansson, Utrecht: The importance of the prenatal and early postnatal environment for the behavioural and physiological development of chickens.
Uwe Rösler, Berlin: ESBL and AmpC colonization of broilers - influence of hygiene and management.
Volker Siemers, Visbek: Exhaust air treatment in poultry farming - procedure, services, costs.
Susanne Rothstein, Göttingen: Larval meal produced from the black soldier fly as a potential protein supplier for broilers.

The German Branch will also host the 12th European Symposium on Poultry Genetics in Hannover, October 26th to 28th, 2021! More information to follow….

Inga Tiemann, Secretary, Germany Branch

Italy

The Italian Branch of WPSA is organizing the 56th edition of its annual meeting that will be held on April 24th, 2020 at the Palacongressi of Rimini (Italy), and it will deal with the topic: ‘Are We Pushing Broilers to Their Biological Limits?’ This emerging topic will be explored thanks to the contributions of a number of prestigious international speakers.

PROGRAMME

09:45   Opening Address, Martino Cassandro, President of Italian Branch of World’s Poultry Science Association
10:00  Applying Energy Balance Modelling to Assess the Limit of Efficiency of Broiler Chickens, Ilkka Leinonen, Natural Resources Institute (Finland)
10:30   Is gut functionality a limitation for maximizing growth, Birger Svihus, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (Norway)
11:00  Rapid Growth and Leg Weakness in Broilers, Bob Wideman, Jr., University of Arkansas (USA)
11:30  Fast Muscle Growth in Meat Quality Issues, Massimiliano Petracci, University of Bologna (Italy)
12:00   Consequences of the Breeding of Broilers for Rapid Growth and High Breast Meat Yield, and Their Genetic Mitigation, Avigdor Cahaner, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)
12:30  Discussion and Conclusions
13:30  Lunch Break
14:30  Meeting of WPSA Members


On the day b2021 espnefore the meeting, WG2 members will visit the ‘Rimini Conference Centre’ where the 23rd edition of European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) will be hosted from September 20th to 23rd, 2021. The city of Rimini, is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and helping to forge the future of poultry meat science. More details are already available at the Symposia website: https://www.espn2021.eu/.

Massimiliano Petracci, Secretary, Italian Branch of WPSA
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Japan

The Journal of Poultry Science (JPS), the official scientific journal published by the Japan Poultry Science Association (JPSA), became a member of PubMed Central (PMC), and the articles of the journal can be accessed through the PubMed search engine. We welcome the contribution of original research articles and reviews to the JPS using the following web site: https://jpn-psa.jp/en/jps-en/.

The 2020 Spring Meeting of JPSA will be held at Kyoto University in Kyoto during 27–28 March where presentations of original research findings, a symposium, a general meeting and a council meeting will be organised. The council meeting will be held on March 27, and the presentations of research findings as well as the general meeting will be organised on March 28.

The presentations of original research findings will include 48 titles, 17 titles of which will be candidates for the Presentation Award of young researchers. The theme of the symposium is: ‘The needs of a Ph.D. status in the industries’. It will be a joint symposium with the Japan Animal Science Association. For The detailed information please see the JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/oshirase/?lang=en).

The best paper award for young researchers will be announced, 2019 of the JPS will be announced during the general meeting. The General meeting members will also involve the election of new board members and the Secretary for the JPSA, including Japan’s councillor members for the World Poultry Science Association (WPSA) assembly in Paris. The officers will be elected to serve for the next two years.

The JPS (the official journal of JPSA, IF: 0.670) always welcomes the submission of reviews and original papers. Free access to download the full-published articles in JPS is available on J-Stage (https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/browse/jpsa), which provides an excellent opportunity for all to access the published articles.

JPSA wants to contribute to poultry science, not only in Japan, but all over the globe by enhancing its international activities with JPSA members from different countries. Thus, JPSA has a membership category for foreign citizens residing abroad as ‘Special International Member’. The page charges to publish such member’s papers in the JPS are set the regular membership price. JPSA invariably welcomes new members from all over the world. Please visit our JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/?lang=en) for further information.

Naoki Goto, Secretary of WPSA Japan Branch

New Zealand

The 2020 New Zealand Poultry Industry Conference will be held on 6-7 October 2020, in Nelson, New Zealand

IReza Abdollahi, Secretary, New Zealand Branch

Russia

Scientific communication with industry: The VNITIP Federal Scientific Centre of the Russian Science Academy in Serguiev Posad, Moscow Region, recognises the importance of scientific communication with the industry and has a programme to encourage this effort. Every year more than 1000 experts from Russia and abroad attend lectures from leading scientists in poultry industry areas, exchange experiences and discuss innovations from local and foreign poultry science efforts in Ptitsegrad. All are welcome to attend the courses in Serguiev Posad.

Tatiana Vasilieva, Secretary

 

Spain

The Spanish branch of WPSA organises the 7th Mediterranean Poultry Summit that will be held from March 25-27, 2020 in the city of Córdoba. More than 250 attendees are expected at this meeting from more than 30 countries. Scientists will present about 100 scientific communications covering many topics of poultry science, especially on topics important for the Mediterranean area.
In addition, 15 guest speakers will provide keynote presentations during the sessions. Several workshops will also be held. Speakers such as Michael Czarick, who will chair a workshop on ventilation or Wim Tondeur, who will chair a workshop on slaughtering problems, will be among the guest stars for the event. All information on the Mediterranean Poultry Summit is available at: www.mpn-wpsa.org

Carlos Garcés Narro, Secretary, Spain Branch

Turkey

The General Assembly of the WPSA Turkish Branch, which is held every three years, met on 21 January 2020. After the approval of the activity report, elections were held for new board members. The following members were elected:

President: Prof. Dr Rüveyde Akbay
Vice-President: Dr Kemal Akman
Secretary: Prof. Dr Kâzım Şahin
Treasurer: Assoc. Prof. Dr Cengizhan Mızrak
Board Member: Mr. Gülbenk Yalçın
Board Member: Mr. Yüce Canoler
Board Member: Prof. Dr Sezen Özkan

In the first board meeting held after the General Assembly, it was decided to organise a symposium with the title ‘Hormones, Antibiotics and GDO in Poultry Meat.’ That symposium will be held on 19 March in Ankara to inform the general public about the status of these factors, and to dispel misconceptions regarding the occurrence of these items in poultry products.
.
Prof. Dr Sezen Özkan, Secretary, WPSA Turkish Branch

United Kingdom

New Opportunity: The GD Rosen Academic Career Advancement Award

The UK branch is pleased to announce a new Academic Career Advancement Award in memory of Professor Gordon D Rosen. Gordon contributed a highly logical and very descriptive approach to animal nutrition from the 1960s through to just a few years before his death in 2015. A full obituary for him is available in volume 71 of World’s Poultry Science Journal. He was an inspirational person whose curiosity and gently framed yet penetrating questions made him a legend. There is a generation of scientists influenced by his presence – always in the front row – of scientific meetings, and now his wife Vanda would like to encourage other scientists to develop their own inquisitiveness through this new award.

The GD Rosen Academic Career Advancement Award provides £2000 each year to fund an academic adventure. With this aim, the award is open in nature, while particularly encouraging people to become multidisciplinary in their approach to research. The award is open to UK branch members who are within their early career spanning from 2 years to 5 years post PhD viva. Examples of proposals might include a request to attend an academic conference (particularly one outside your core field), support for an educational tour of another country or global region, support to visit another institution to learn a new technique or approach, or support to publish a major research output in a journal requiring publication fees.

Proposal forms and conditions of the GD Rosen Award can be found on the WPSA-UK website.
The DEADLINE for this years APPLICATIONS was 30th January 2020.

Dr Emily Burton, UK Branch Secretary

USA

The coalition of North American branches of WPSA (USA, Canada and Mexico) is excited to announce that the coalition is in the process of developing a bid to host the XXVII World’s Poultry Congress in 2024. We have selected Toronto, Canada, as our proposed site for this event and look forward to sharing more bid information with our WPSA colleagues over the next few months leading up to the World’s Poultry Congress this summer in Paris.

Bob Buresh, WPSA Senior Vice President, and Secretary USA Branch

 

December 2019 Newsletter

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Volume 49, December 2019  Newsletter Editor: Dr G.B. Havenstein,  

 

2020 wpc  

World's Poultry Congres 2020

16-20 August, Paris, France

Scholarship Awards

During the XXVI World’s Poultry Congress in Paris, France in 2020 Scholarship Awards for respectively the WPSA Paul B. Siegel Research Award and the WPSA Education Award are going to be presented.
Information about the awards and the nominations, which should be received at least six months before the Congress can be found here.
The deadline for receipt of submissions will be 1st March 2020.
Nominations must be send by e-mail to . One hard copy of the complete nomination should be send to Dr R.W.A.W. (Roel) Mulder, Secretary WPSA, PO Box 31, 7360 AA Beekbergen, The Netherlands.
In case you want to send the nominations by Courier Service, please e-mail for the address (courier services cannot deliver to a PO Box).
To show how awards are utilized, those nominated must, if successful, undertake to present a report of their work at the next World’s Poultry Congress following the one at which the award was made.

International Poultry Hall of Fame

The next presentation of members for the International Poultry Hall of Fame (IPHF) will take place at the next World’s Poultry Science Congress in Paris, France in 2020.
To have enough time to prepare the election for the International Poultry Hall of Fame the nominations of individuals should start as soon as possible.
You can find the guidelines for the nomination and election procedure and the instruction sheet for the 2020 Hall of Fame selection here.
Branches with less than 100 members have the right to nominate 1 candidate. Branches with more than 100 members have the right to nominate 2 candidates for the International Poultry Hall of Fame.
If your Branch intends to nominate a candidate or candidates for the IPHF you should pay attention to the deadline for the nomination: December 31st, 2019.

Cliff D. Carpenter International Essay Competition

At the latest Board meeting, held during the Poultry Science Association (PSA) meeting in Montréal, Canada, it was decided to start the Cliff D. Carpenter International Essay competition.
Five travel awards ($2000 each) will be made available on a competitive basis to full time graduate students for attendance at the XXVI World’s Poultry Congress in Paris, France, 16-20 August 2020. The original essay of up to 2000 words should address the topic ‘The possible role of the World’s Poultry Science Association in education’. The 5 winners should come from different continents, they have to be a member in 2019 and must be between the ages of 18-30.
The details for the Cliff D. Carpenter International Essay competition are published on the website and you can download the guidelines. Deadline is 1st February 2020.

Nominating Advisory Committee (NAC)

Preparations are underway for the formation of a Nominating Advisory Committee (NAC), which committee is in charge of seeking candidates for the WPSA Board 2020-2024. The NAC will be chaired by Dr Mamduh Sifri. Branches and members can propose candidates for the offices of President, five Vice-Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer.
Further information can be found in the WPSA Constitution and By-laws (Constitution article IV-5 and By-Laws article II-8 through 11).

World's Poultry Congress 2024

The Board of the World’s Poultry Science Association (WPSA) has received three bids to organise the World’s Poultry Congress 2024. The bidding Branches are Argentina (Buenos Aires), Canada/Mexico/USA (Toronto) and South Africa (Cape Town).
In the Constitution it is stated that if there are more than two bids, an electronic vote of the Council will be conducted to pre-select two finalists (WPSA By-Laws, Article III-4).
The winner of the bid will be selected by the Council by secret ballot during the Council meeting, which will be held at WPC2020 in Paris.

59 Branches were eligible for the pre-selection, 33 branches took the opportunity to send their votes.
After receiving the ballot forms the following result was obtained:
Argentina        Buenos Aires 113 votes
Canada           Toronto           120 votes
South Africa    Cape Town     143 votes

The Canada/Mexico/USA bid and the South Africa bid therefore are selected to the final ballot during the Council meeting, 18 August 2020, Paris, France.

Updates on the above mentioned topics will be publsihed on the WPSA website under the heading !! WPC2020 !!.

   

Abstract Submission and Registration for WPC2020

Abstract submission and registration for WPC2020 are open. Click here for details.

 

Executive Committee

Secretary's Report

mulder roel

World’s Poultry Congress 2020 Paris, France
Preparations are underway for the Council meeting during the next WPC. One of the main points on the agenda of the Council meeting will be the election of the city and country for the next World’s Poultry Congress in 2024. There have been 3 bids to hold the WPC 2024. According to our Constitution and By-Laws, branches are voting which two candidates cities will be forwarded to official vote during the Council meeting. The candidate cities are: Cape Town proposed by the South Africa branch and Toronto proposed by the Canada/USA/Mexica branches.

Branches have also been informed on nomination procedures for the WPSA Paul B. Siegel Research Award; the WPSA Education Award; Inductees into The International Poultry Hall of Fame; and, for the Nominating Advisory Committee (i.e., the committee in charge of seeking candidates to serve on WPSA’s board for the years 2020-2024). For the NAC, Branches and members can propose candidate names to be considered by the NAC for service on the board. Further information and all guidelines for each of these committees are available on www.wpsa.com under WPC2020.

WPSA presence at exhibitions and conferences
In 2020, WPSA will be present during many events. Examples are the exhibitions IPPE, Atlanta, USA, VIV MEA, Abu Dhabi, UAE and Victam Asia and Animal Health and Nutrition, Bangkok, Thailand and the scientific meetings, the Mediterranean Poultry Summit, 25-27 March 2020, Cordoba, Spain and the 1st Poultry Nutrition symposium 25-26 March 2020 in Bangkok, Thailand. Information on the programmes can be found on www.mpn-wpsa.org/spain2020 and the WPSA Calendar.

Promotional materials of WPSA, the World’s Poultry Science Journal, WPC 2020 in Paris, France, symposia and conferences will be on display. We expect to meet with many members during these events. Members and all interested persons are invited to attend the events and to meet many other WPSA members and representatives.

WPSA World’s Poultry Science Journal
Starting 2020 the World’s Poultry Science Journal will be hosted and produced by Taylor and Francis Publishers.

WPSA programmes
WPSA has several programmes to support members and branches. Details on the Travel Grant programmes, the Speakers’ Bureau programme and proposals for Branch Development can be found on the WPSA website under Support. Criteria for eligibility are published together with the (different) deadlines for the individual programmes. Please follow the instructions as inaccurate, incomplete and late applications have to be rejected.

Cooperation with the organization on World Veterinary Education in Production Animal Health (WVEPAH)
The WVEPAH, a non-profit organization organizes training courses on poultry (for 3 à 4 weeks) in several countries. More details are on www.wvepah.org. All activities will also be announced on our website and in the WPS Journal.

Dr Roel Mulder

Treasurer's Report

bradley francine new

This quarter has been an active one, with much activity in Latin and South America. In October, I was pleased to attend Ovum 2019 in Lima, Peru. Prior to my arrival the Peruvians, after some years of inactivity, had reorganized their Branch. Of great assistance to me, both before and during the meeting, were Branch members Dr Eliana Icochea and Dr Alfredo Condemarin (new Branch President). With their local assistance, I was able to put together a WPSA Student Breakfast Meeting, the day before the start of Ovum 2019. 

Students from different parts of the country made their way to Lima for the event. I gave the first talk on students using WPSA for their professional development. I spoke in English, but all my slides had been translated into Spanish by Benjamin Ruiz (Watt Publishing). I also gave the history of WPSA and my personal history of working with poultry and the poultry industry. Dr Icochea spoke next, followed by Dr Condemarin, and then Dr Cobian (Pres of AMEVEA, Peru). The former President of the Mexico Branch, Dr Carlos Lopez Coello, gave an emotional short address to the students about seizing opportunities and making a lifelong career in poultry.

A nice brunch was served to the students and they ate heartily. Some of them had arisen at 2:30 AM and taken a 3 hour bus ride to be present. Even after the Programme ended and all the food was gone, the students lingered and visited with the adult poultry scientists. Those of us in the latter group, all left with full hearts.

We now have our nucleus of student members in the Peru Branch. Two have already contacted me about applying for Travel Grants. I see much promise in the revitalized Branch.

Past President Edir da Silva joined me to staff a WPSA booth at Ovum 2019. Dr Icochea secured a table for WPSA in the booth of the Scientific University of the South. The booth actually backed up to the booth of Gonzaga University in Chincha. All of their students, who had travelled to Lima, attended the WPSA Student Breakfast. So we had guardian angels in those students and their professor.

During the course of the event, I was able to meet with representatives of several Branches and collect their dues. We also met with a contingent from Cuba, who want to reactivate their Branch. In addition to members from South America, I had interactions with the Mexico Branch officers and met the new President of ANECA.

I have been contacted by many student members interested in using WPSA Travel Grants in 2020. Of course, interest in attending WPC - Paris is very high. I am delighted to be working with many of those students and their major professors.

My warmest wishes to you and your families as you celebrate your end of the year holidays.

Dr Francine Bradley, Treasurer


World's Poultry Congress 2020, Paris, France

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It is with great pleasure that the French branch of WPSA invites you to attend the 26th World Poultry Congress in Paris, from 16th to 20th August 2020. Our ambition is to prepare an attractive congress for the benefit of a large number of participants from all over the world. We will be giving special consideration to the Mediterranean and African Poultry Networks, by offering them the possibility of holding specific satellite symposia, and we are also planning to organise a symposium with FAO. As usual for a WPC, the programme will include an exhibition for companies within the Congress Centre, and we will offer a Youth programme as well as a Young Scientist programme. We plan to make the scientific programme highly interactive and interdisciplinary.

Registration: In order to insure your participation to this prestigious event, you can now register and benefit from the Early bird registration fees until December 31st, 2019. Please join us in Paris at the Palais des Congress (Porte Maillot) on August 16-20, and meet more than 3000 delegates from over 100 countries.

Submission: The WPC programme will feature object-oriented sessions integrating various approaches to address a complex challenge, and specialized sessions corresponding with the scope of our WPSA working groups. In addition, 11 plenary talks will address major issues for the poultry sector as a whole and will take place all day on Monday August 17 and on the morning of Thursday August 20. You have until December 31st 2019 as the very last day to submit your work for an oral or e-poster presentation. Please consider this as a strong deadline as there will be no date extension.

Renowned speakers from all continents of the world will be involved with WPC2020 and will speak on the following topics:

• Nutrition
• Breeding and Genetics
• Egg Quality
• Poultry Meat Quality
• Reproduction
• Hygiene and Pathology
• Waterfowl
• Poultry Welfare and Management
• Turkeys
• Education and Information
• Physiology

http://www.wpcparis2020.com/ 


Newly Compiled List of Poultry Educational Resources

In her role as one of the Vice Presidents of the WPSA, Julie Roberts from the Australian Branch has compiled a list of Poultry Educational Resources which are available free of charge via the internet. Some of the web sites listed also have resources for sale. However, the focus of this list is resources which are free and therefore available to all members.

The list is posted on the WPSA website, and will always be a ‘work in progress’ as some resources become available and added, or others, if they are out of date or no longer available, will be removed from the internet list.

If members are aware of other resources that are available that could be added to the list, please contact Mrs Dorien Velner at the main office by email: with the title of the resource, how to access it and a short description.

All entries will be checked on a regular basis to make sure that they continue to be available, however if you find any irregularities, please contact us at


European Federation

The next European Poultry Conference will be held in Valencia, Spain in 2022. A full report for EPC2018 was published in the December 2018 issue of the WPSJ.

The European Federation has numerous conferences planned between now and on into 2021. A list of most of our upcoming conferences may be found on the WPSA Calendar at www.wpsa.com
News from several European Federation Working Groups are provided below.

WPSA European Working Group News

WG2

2021 espnThe Italian Branch will host the 23rd edition of European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) which will be held at the Palacongressi of Rimini (Italy) from September 20-23, 2021. The city of Rimini, is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and helping to forge the future of poultry meat science. More details are already available at the symposium website: https://www.espn2021.eu/.

WG5

Poultry Meat Quality

2021 Eggmeat logo EMQThe next ‘XXV European Symposium on the Quality of Poultry Meat’ will be conjointly held with the ‘XIX European Symposium on the Quality of Eggs and Egg Products’ from June 21 to 23, 2021 in Kraków, Poland. Please visit http://www.eggmeat2021.com/ to keep yourself updated. Special reduced registration fees will be available for WPSA members and students. We will look forward to seeing all of you there. Prominent invited speakers from American and European Institutions will address emerging issues on poultry meat and egg production. A new website will be developed and registration information will be provided in the near future.


Asia Pacific Federation

The host for the upcoming 12th APPC was named during the General Meeting, and the China Branch will host that event.

2020 apf poultry nutrition symposiumThe Asia Pacific Federation is organising a Poultry Nutrition Symposium on 25 & 26 March 2020 in Bangkok, Thailand. The programme is available on the WPSA website.
For more information please contact Dr Nasir Mukhtar, 

WPSA Asian-Pacific Working Group News

A/P WG3

Ratites

There will be Ratite Research Sessions during the upcoming World Poultry Congress in Paris, France from 16-20 August 2020. Please send any suggestions for contributions and topics to .

Researchers involved in research on any Ratites (ostriches, emus, rheas, cassowaries or kiwis) are asked to contact the Ratite Group. Please send an email to: .


Anel Engelbrecht, Chair


7th Mediterranean Poulty Summit

The Mediterranean Poultry Network has planning underway for the 7th Mediterranean Poultry Summit that will be held at the University of Cordoba in Cordoba, Spain during Mach 25-27 2020. The website is: www.mpn-wpsa.org. Following are several tentative dates for you to plan for this conference.

Important Dates:

Conference Dates    March 25-27, 2020
Preliminary Notification of Abstract Acceptance   December 1, 2019
Early Bird Registration   December 21, 2019
Final Notification of Abstract Acceptance   December 21, 2019
Full Paper Submission Deadline   December 31, 2019
Registration Deadline   March 25, 2020

Carlos Garcés Narro <>


World's Poultry Science Journal

From 2020 the World’s Poultry Science Journal will be published by Taylor & Francis. If you have requested an online subscription as part of your membership, you will receive an email from Taylor & Francis before the end of the year with instructions on how to access WPSJ online from the new website www.tandfonline.com/TWPS. Please ensure that you add '@tandfonline.com' to your safe senders list to ensure these types of emails are not sent to your spam folder or blocked by your service provider. Should you have any questions about your online access please contact ”.

Upcoming articles

Articles in upcoming Journal(s)

  • E.A. Awad - Prebiotics supplementation: An effective approach to mitigate the detrimental effects of heat stress in broiler chickens
  • T.R. Kannaki - Marek's disease: Time to review the emerging threat in Indian poultry
  • J.-J. Chen - Chromolaena odorata as a potential feed additive bioresource to alleviate heat strss in chickens in the humid tropics
  • A. Salamon - The double-yolked egg: from the 'miracle of packaging' to nature's 'mistake'
  • O. Olgun - Evaluation of dietary presence or use of cadmium in poultry
  • M. Tixier-Boichard - From the jungle fowl to highly-performing chickens: are we reaching limits?

Summaries

Prebiotics supplementation: An effective approach to mitigate the detrimental effects of heat stress in broiler chickens

E.A. AWAD, I. ZULKIFLI, S. RAMIAH, E.S. KHALIL and M.E. ABDALLH

As a consequence of global warming and food security issues, heat stress has become an emerging problem. Heat stress causes huge economic losses in the broiler industry that negatively affects the production performance of chickens. Therefore, a variety of strategies have been examined for mitigating the heat stress problem. Among these strategies, the use of prebiotics has received increasing interest due to the beneficial effects of prebiotics on the health and production of heat-stressed broilers. The evidence from existing studies suggests that prebiotics can mitigate the negative effects of heat stress on broiler chickens by benefiting the intestinal microbiota, gut morphology, oxidative status, physiological stress response and subsequently growth performance of broiler chickens. For instance, prebiotics given to heat-stressed broilers at a dose as low as 0.025% have been shown to improve the feed intake, body weight gain and feed efficiency by 7.5, 9.9 and 2.3%, respectively. This review summarises the recent findings on prebiotics as an effective approach to improve the well-being, health and growth performance of broilers under heat stress conditions.

Marek’s disease: Time to review the emerging threat in Indian Poultry

T.R. KANNAKI and V. GOWTHAMAN

Marek’s disease (MD) is one of the re-emerging diseases in Indian poultry. MD outbreaks are reported from different parts of the country in spite of vaccination, causing major economic losses. Flock mortality of 10-40% was observed in vaccinated flocks during outbreaks, although MD is well controlled with vaccination. Almost 100% of the commercial poultry flocks are vaccinated at hatchery level. Bivalent (HVT+SB1 or HVT+301B/1) or monovalent (HVT) vaccines are used in India. In spite of the intensive vaccination practice, outbreaks are being reported from different parts of the world including India. MD virus (MDV) Indian field isolates from different outbreaks during last decade are categorised into virulent (vMDV) and very virulent (vvMDV) pathotypes based on different serotype 1 specific gene sequencing and in vivo pathotyping. The emergence of virulence in MDV is attributed to compromised bio-security, concurrent immunosuppressive diseases and vaccination failure. MD outbreaks in vaccinated flocks of Indian poultry flocks cause annual loss of approximately 4 crore Indian rupees. Country-wide surveillance and reporting of MD outbreaks and further characterization of the Indian field isolate should be taken as a priority. Reviewing the current vaccination strategy, and examining the need for the introduction of more effective vaccines that give better protection against the more virulent strains should be considered with equal importance along with improved bio-security measures, management practices and more effective control of immunosuppressive diseases.

Chromolaena odorata as a potential feed additive bioresource to alleviate heat stress in chickens in the humid tropics

K.A. LARTEY, D.-J. KANG, Q.-H. ZHANG, C.-Q. SHI, F. YANG, H.-Y. LIN, R. GOONERATNE and J.-J. CHEN

Chromolaena odorata contains polyphenols and antioxidant enzymes that activate biology defence mechanisms and stress-sensing transcription factors to prevent oxidative damage and heat stress in chicken. Dietary inclusions of C. odorata leaf meal at 12%, and C. odorata crude flavonoids at 400 mg/kg/d exerted competitive exclusion to enhance gut eubiosis, humoral immunity, hypoglycaemia and metabolic functions, necessary to attenuate oxidative stress in chickens. Ethanol extract of the herbal plant at 25 – 400 µg/mL showed a strong antioxidant capacity in vitro, similar to 10- 80 µg/mL standard ascorbic acid. Chromomoric acid C- 1 from C. odorata methanol extract, at 10 µg also demonstrated anti-inflammatory potential by activating Nrf2 and suppressing NF-κB in a luciferase reporter assay at inhibition capacity (IC50) of 6.9 µM. These biological defence properties of the obnoxious weed have potential to maintain gut microbial homeostasis and gut integrity, enhance antioxidative physiologies for cellular oxidative balance, and mitigate oxidative damage required to alleviate heat stress. The invading nature of the plant in the humid tropics makes it a readily available and cheap bioresource. Hepatotoxic, mutagenic and cytotoxic evaluations suggest the aerial parts of the herbal plant is a safe bioresource for animal nutrition and sub-therapeutical uses.

The double-yolked egg: from the ‘miracle of packaging’ to nature’s ‘mistake’

A. SALAMON and J.P. KENT

Double-yolked (DY) eggs were mostly described in domestic precocial species, and are rarely found in nature. It is estimated that 1-3% of domestic hen and duck eggs are DY.

DY eggs occur when two yolks are encapsulated in a single shell and therefore differ from SY eggs in their external and internal characteristics. In previous decades DY eggs were distinguished from SY eggs only by their external characteristics, and this proved to be wrong, as over 40% of DY eggs have similar external characteristics in terms of size and shape to SY eggs. The internal characteristics of DY eggs constrain their fertility. Yolks in DY eggs tend to be smaller, probably ovulated early and are thus immature, having a significant negative impact on their reproductive potential with lower fertility levels. Further, the presence of a second yolk facilitates additional albumen secretion with the size of each yolk determining the additional amount secreted. This creates a primacy effect, i.e. the first yolk in the oviduct could be fertilized, but the second may not be. The unique yolk and embryo positioning is associated with low hatchability. These factors reduce the reproductive potential of DY egg yolks individually or cumulatively. Thus the above supports the view that DY eggs are nature’s ‘mistake’ and are viewed here as an extreme end of a normal distribution of variation and is unlikely to evolve further in avian species. However, there is still potential for further non-invasive research using DY eggs, especially in studies of factors affecting fertility.

Evaluation of dietary presence or use of cadmium in poultry

O.OLGUN, A.Ö. YILDIZ and A. ŞAHIN

Cadmium is a heavy metal and non-essential for animals. In practice, cadmium toxicity is quite rare in farm animals because the level of cadmium in commercial diets is very low. However, cadmium-contaminated feedstuffs in the diet may cause toxicity. The cadmium, which is absorbed from digestive system, accumulates in the body tissues, primarily kidney and liver, and causes metabolic and physiological inconveniences in the body. Hereby, economic losses occur due to the decrease in feed intake and egg production. It will cause mortality depending on the level and duration of exposure to cadmium. The toxic level of cadmium varies according to the bird species and their ages. Chickens are more sensitive to cadmium toxicity than quails. Lower dietary cadmium doses (<10 mg/kg) have positive effects on production performance and eggshell quality, but higher doses of cadmium (>10 mg/kg) cause economic losses due to worsening productive performance and eggshell quality in poultry. Dietary zinc, selenium, vitamins and plant extracts will help to eliminate the negative consequences of cadmium contamination in feedstuff. However, further studies are needed to determine the toxic level of cadmium, and the possible positive effects of cadmium on performance and product quality when used at lower doses in poultry.

From the jungle fowl to highly-performing chickens: are we reaching limits?

M. TIXIER-BOICHARD

The cumulated effects of domestication and subsequent selection by humans have led to an impressive diversification of the chicken, at the phenotypic level as well as the genome level. In theory, selection may reach a plateau when all favourable alleles have reached fixation. Yet, current data in poultry show that selection response can still take place after 50 generations of selection or more. The mechanisms maintaining selection response in closed populations may involve recombination, mutation and epistatic interactions. Furthermore, the continuous addition of new selection criteria can delay the possible limit associated to single trait selection. Thus, selection response is mainly threatened by inbreeding which occurs as a consequence of a narrow genetic base and/or a poor management of genetic variability within the population. Biological limits are encountered when selection is degrading fitness traits to a point that the survival of individuals is affected. Biological limits induced by extreme performance can be by-passed by adapting the breeding program, introducing new selection criteria, changing the management or developing remedial technologies. Extreme situations affecting bird welfare raise ethical issues. Lameness in broilers or spontaneous bone breakage in layers are painful and one may question whether such pain is justified by the human need for protein consumption. Regulations or market requirements may be set up to limit the performance at a level which is compatible with animal welfare, resulting in a voluntary limit to selection. Furthermore, highly performing animals need a very well controlled environment with high quality diets, which may divert food resources from humans and may not be sustainable. Breeding objectives have to integrate environmental impact and robustness towards the use of alternative feed sources, in addition to production level, product quality, health and welfare status.



Branch News

Austria

Conference on November 8th, 2019 - Successful conference in Upper Austria

On the 8th November 2019, the World Poultry Science Association (WPSA) Branch Austria held its second conference titled "Feeding, housing and management – challenges for the broiler industry regarding foot pad health” in Kremsmünster, Upper Austria. To the delight of the organisers, the event was fully booked.

More than 100 participants informed themselves in an interdisciplinary context about the multitude factors that lead to foot pad lesions and measures to prevent this problem.

The speakers highlighted the topic from various perspectives: aspects of health status, management, feeding and stable climate were discussed intensively by participants from the poultry industry, feed industry, research, veterinarians and practitioners.

Univ. Prof. Dr. Martin Gierus, Chairman of the WPSA Branch Austria, was pleased about the successful conference, which was attended by guests from Switzerland, Germany, The Netherlands and Austria: "The great response to our event shows the demand for a joint exchange within the entire poultry industry and confirmed the topic selection “foot pad health” as a current issue that finds exceptionally interest. We are pleased about the great concern, that reinforces our determination to continue with activities and to follow our goals as part of the WPSA.”

Prior to this event, the Austrian Branch also launched a new website http://www.wpsa-austria.at. With this new tool, online conference registration was possible and organization and communication with all members of the Austrian Branch will be improved.

Azerbaijan

On April 26, 2019, a Scientific-Practical Seminar on ‘Current Situation and Development Perspectives of Breeding Poultry’ was held at the Scientific-Research Institute of Animal Husbandry (SRIAH) with support of WPSA.

2020 december azerbaijanThe seminar was attended by representatives of the Goygol District Executive Authorities, the Ministry of Agriculture, members of the WPSA Azerbaijan branch, experts from ASAU, the Agriculture and Plant Protection research Institute, the Zoology and Veterinary Research Institutes, poultry experts, and representatives of large poultry factories (Mususlu, Sabah, Marcan broilers, Milas Agro), and farmers.

Speakers at the seminar made extensive reports on the current state of the industry, human resources, the industry’s primary problems, potential solutions for those problems, and prospects for industry development. Questions from the participants were answered.

The seminar was devoted to the development of poultry farming in progressive ways in the republic. Although it was on the eve of nearly full provision for our country in terms of eggs and poultry production, during the seminar many issues were considered. This seminar also presented the current situation for the global poultry sector and its future trends, and discusses the challenges the poultry sector is facing.

It was noted that the lack of poultry farms in the country and the development of poultry eggs in the republic did not fully meet the poultry development programme in the republic. The creation of new Breeding Farms was also considered as the most important issue of the day in order to eliminate the lack of breeding eggs in the country.

Eggs imported from the foreign countries due to the scarcity of hatching eggs in our country, sometimes bring with them pathogens that cause diseases. Thus, the quality of hatching eggs in the republic is one of the most important issues. It was noted that there is a great need for the help of competent organizations to resolve these issues.

During the seminar, it was emphasized that the demand for poultry meat in Azerbaijan has recently been almost completely taken care of with local production. Poultry farmers, however, face some difficulties, and most importantly, lack of breeder farms in the country.

Breeder farms have been established within some poultry companies. Simply these laboratories need special laboratories to detect the genetic potential of highly productive bird crosses. State-supported test stations are needed.

At the trial testing stations, the physiological characteristics of the birds living in an area of the Republic, and their resistance to diseases, and the level of breeding in the country should be checked, and then must be provided to the poultry producers. One of the challenges facing entrepreneurs is fodder production.

It is true that factories producing feed for poultry have been built in the Balakan, Imishli and Ganja regions of the country. Accordingly, a breeder research farm should be established in the Scientific Research Institute of Animal Husbandry, and research work should be carried out in this direction, where selection and testing should be carried out. As a result, new bird crosses and lines, as well as breeds should be created, and they should be investigated to increase productivity. This work should be organized in Azerbaijan and our poultry scientists are ready for cooperation with scientists and other members of WPSA. The first problem of poultry sector in Azerbaijan is lack of breeder stock.

The most important areas for research is on those factors that decrease the cost of producing poultry, as well as on other factors that reduce other difficulties in this field, is that Azerbaijan does not have a breeding work.

It was noted that establishment of breeding farms is very costly, so it was necessary to establish breeder farms for producing hatching eggs and to support farmers with the production of healthy quality commercial chicks. It was also noted at the workshop that experience sharing should be widely used to strengthen human resources in the Breeding Farms.

The Azerbaijan branch of the World’s Poultry Science Association believes that cooperation, worldwide experience and support in breeding poultry will have positive influences on development of this field in our country.

November 18, 2019, Scientific-Practical Seminar ‘Innovative Approach in Poultry’ held at SRIAH with the support of WPSA.

On November 18, 2019 a scientific-practical seminar on ‘Innovative Approaches in Poultry’ was held at the Azerbaijan Scientific-Research Institute of Animal Husbandry of the Agrarian Science and Innovation Center through the support of the World Poultry Science Association. The seminar was attended by representatives of small and large poultry farms operating in different regions of the country, livestock farmers, ASAU students, research institutions and members of the Azerbaijan Branch of WPSA.

2020 december azerbaijan 2 2020 december azerbaijan 3
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The Director of the Scientific Research Institute of Animal Husbandry, Mahir Hajiyev, and also President of Azerbaijan’s WPSA Branch, opened the seminar referring to on-going reforms in the agricultural sector. He said that the implementation of intensive methods of meeting the population's demand for meat and meat products is of particular importance. In particular, the development of indoor and semi-enclosed poultry production as a new field for livestock production is based on modern world experience. At present, the number of birds in all economic categories in the country has exceeded 30,473,000, and the production of eggs exceeded 1 billion 676 million. Azerbaijan’s self-sufficiency for poultry production has increased significantly. . One of the important directions of scientific progress is the further development of poultry. Head of the Media Department at Agrarian Science and Innovation Center, Nicat Nasirli, spoke about the application of technological innovations in poultry, proper nutrition and marketing strategies.

Mete Turkoglu, an employee of the Igdir University of the Republic of Turkey, and Sevil Abbasguliyeva, Head of Laboratory at the Institute of Agriculture and Research, gave a presentation on innovative approaches in poultry farming. ASAU Professor and WPSA Azerbaijan Branch member, Arif Tagiyev gave the workshop participants some information about the economic importance of quail farms as a new direction for poultry farming. Rustam Gasimov, a veterinarian with Marjan Broiler LLC, stressed the importance of combating poultry diseases in captive birds. Giyas Hajiyev, Director of Mususlu Poultry LLC, stressed the importance of training qualified national personnel. As part of the workshop, the newly commissioned feed and milk analysis laboratories were reviewed at the Scientific Research Institute of Animal Husbandry, and the participants were told how this modern machinery operated.

At the end of the workshop, members of WPSA’s Azerbaijan Branch expressed their intention to promote WPSA within Azerbaijan, and to organize future high level international events about Poultry Science in our country. Members of the branch also declared Giyas Hajiyev, as a new member of Azerbaijan Branch of WPSA.

2020 december azerbaijan 6

Mahir Hajiyev, Director of the Scientific Research Institute of Animal Husbandry, and President of Azerbaijan branch WPSA,
Azerbaijan State Agrarian University, Veterinary Medicine and Zoo Engineering Faculty
e-mail: 

Brazil

FACTA held the 36th FACTA Conference, from 14-16 May 2019, at Expo D. Pedro, in Campinas (SP). This year around 350 people attended the conference, among them key opinion leaders, Professors, management level, veterinarians, students of post-graduations programmes and technicians, with relevant discussion about the present and future of the Brazilian poultry industry.

In Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul, on 24-25 September 2019, the Ambience and Welfare in Poultry and Pig Industry Course was held, with 160 attendants. The event aimed to bring together and discuss the most updated information on animal welfare and ambience.

FACTA moved their administrative headquarters to Barão de Paranapanema Street, 146, Bosque, room 72, block A - Ed. Campinas Commercial Center. Phone: 55 19 3255-8500.

From 25-27 November 2019, FACTA will promote in Recife, Pernambuco, the event: International on incubation of eggs and Broiler.

The next FACTA Conference, 37th edition will be held from 12-14 May 2020, at Expo D. Pedro, in Campinas (SP). This year's theme will be ‘One Health’, in partnership with FENAGRA.

France

World's Poultry Congress 2020

20WPC blocmarque blocdates

WPC2020 (August, 16-20, 2020) will take place in PARIS, and will have the objective of ‘Integrating knowledge for sustainable and diversified poultry productions’. A detailed scientific programme has been developed by the international Scientific Committee. On days 1 and 4, plenary lectures will address global challenges. On days 2 and 3, parallel sessions will feature at least four multidisciplinary ‘object oriented’ sessions in the morning and up to seven specialized sessions in the afternoon. Several early sponsors are already supporting the event and further applications are welcome.

Abstract submission and early bird registration to WPC2020 opened on September 1st and will end on December 31st, 2019. See the WPC2020 website( https://www.wpcparis2020.com/ ) for detailed information.

The board of the French Branch of the WPSA, based on the success of the WPSA European Symposium on Poultry Genetics (ESPG) in 2017 decided to offer a grant of 1.500 € to the Czech Branch for the ESPG congress in Prague that was held in 2019. The board is pleased to receive the following feed-back from Pawel Trefil that the 2019 congress was a great success. Here are his words:

“Dear Dr Michele Tixier Boichard and all members of French branch of WPSA, I would like to express my gratitude to you. Our Czech branch was able to organize the ESPG 2019 in Prague with your great financial support. I am sure that you and all of your members understand, that without your help it would not have been possible to execute it. According to my feeling, the symposium was successful and I would like to express to your branch our big gratitude for your support! Thank you! The symposium in Prague was financially balanced and we are happy not to end up in red numbers!”

Those of us on the board of the French Branch of WPSA think that it is our duty to support, if possible, the other branches to continue to fulfil our own mission of disseminating the scientific progress for the poultry industry. We are really pleased to see that collaboration and brotherhood between branches can be a reality.

Christophe Bostvironnois, President, WPSA France 

Germany

The Spring Conference of the German Branch will take place on March 10 -11, 2020, jointly at the Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology, Dummerstorf, and at the University of Rostock. Abstracts for poster contributions are welcome. Based on their topic and scientific achievements, up to three of the abstracts submitted will be invited for oral presentation and publication. German members will soon receive official invitations to this meeting. Foreign members who might be interested in attending are welcome to contact the branch secretary, Inga Tiemann ().

The German Branch of the WPSA took an excursion to Brittany during September 2019. Every two years, the Branch organizes such an excursion, mostly in conjunction with the occasion of international conferences that are being held. This year’s group visited the SPACE in Rennes, France. Visits were made to two organic farms, Lable Rouge and Loué chickens, which gave a broad and special insight into French poultry farming. Our thanks to the German and French organisers!

Inga Tiemann, Secretary, German Branch

Israel

The 54th Annual Poultry Science Conference of the Israeli Branch was held at the Dan Panorama Hotel in Tel Aviv on November 18-19, 2019. The conference was attended by 550 participants: scientists and students from academia and research institutes, poultry producers, veterinarians, extension specialists and professionals from commercial companies serving the poultry industry in Israel.

During the 2-day conference, 50 lectures were presented in 10 sessions covering the leading poultry science disciplines: Nutrition; Management; Environment protection; Health; Immunology; Genetics, Reproduction, Incubation and Fertility; Layers production; and Broiler production and breast meat quality. The detailed programme (in English) is available here.

The closing session ended with a lively round table discussion, focusing on the challenge of balancing the demand for broiler meat and products, with the over-production capacity of broilers in Israel.

The conference was honoured to host an overseas guest speaker, Dr M. Tixier-Boichard from France, who shared her extensive knowledge and vast experience in the field of poultry genetics and breeding.

An award of appreciation was given to Elisha Tishbi for his contributions to the field of Turkey Production and for his activities over the years in the WPSA-Israeli Branch. For the past four years, he has served as the chairperson of the Branch's audit committee.

Twenty five Israeli companies exhibited unique products for the poultry industry: including pharmaceuticals, feed additives, housing equipment, climate control, etc. The evening social activities included a lecture on current Israeli issues by a popular journalist. In addition, three students were awarded prizes for their research presentations. Twenty five council members were approved by the general assembly for the next 4 years. The new council will soon appoint new Officers and the Executive Board for the Israel branch.

Yitzhak Malka, Secretary, WPSA Israel Branch

Italy

2021 espn

The Italian Branch will host the 23rd edition of European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) which will be held at the Palacongressi of Rimini (Italy) from September 20th to 23rd 2021. The city of Rimini, is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly Venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and helping to forge the future of poultry meat science. More details are already available at the Symposia website: https://www.espn2021.eu/.

This event will be launched on next year by organizing the 56th Annual Congress of the Italian Branch of WPSA in the same location (April 24th, 2020).

Massimiliano Petracci, Secretary, Italian Branch of WPSA
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Japan

The Autumn Meeting of JPSA, 2019 was held at the Iwate University in Morioka, Iwate, during 16–17 September. There were more than 120 attendees. The scientific meeting was consisted of 37 original research presentations and a mini-international symposium. A general meeting and a council meeting were also held. The council meeting was held as the joint committee meeting on September 16. The scientific talks and the general meeting were organized on September 17.

In the Autumn Meeting, the excellent presentation awards were given under the category of ‘student member’ or ‘regular member aged 30 or below’ for the following presentations: 1) “Development of anti-rabies virus nucleocapsid protein IgY by plasmid immunization” by Nanase Kubo (Kyoto Women’s University); 2) “Changes in glucose metabolism function of yolk sac membrane during development of chick embryo” by Mitsuhiro Shibata (UGSAS, Gifu University); and 3) “Changes in amino acid concentrations in broiler chickens under chronic heat-stressed condition” by Daiki Igarashi (Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University). JPSA congratulates the presenters who achieved the excellent presentation awards in the Autumn Meeting 2019.

The mini-international symposium was held on September 17, after the original scientific presentations. It was entitled “Future prospective and issues in Japanese poultry science research – Recent update in research on the development engineering”. Dr Shusei Mizushima, Hokkaido University, made the opening remarks. Then, Dr Hong-Jian Wei from College of Veterinary Medicine, Yunnan Agricultural University, and Dr Yuki Sato from Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, offered their lectures. The titles of lectures were “Current status of local livestock and poultry genetics conservation in China” and “Chicken and quail embryos are attractive model system for experimental developmental biology”, respectively. After the lectures, a free discussion was held.

In this Meeting, the JPSA ‘Incentive Award’ was presented to Dr Daichi Miyahara, Shinshu University. His research topic was “Research about the culture methods for Chicken PGCs”. Moreover, the ‘Excellent Paper Award’ on the published papers in the Journal of Poultry Science in 2018 was presented in this meeting. Bapon Dey, Fuminori Kawabata, Yuko Kawabata, Shotaro Nishimura, and Shoji Tabata, entitled “Bitter taste sensitivity and the expression of bitter taste receptors at different growth stages of chicks”, 55 (3): 204–209, and Chuen-Yu Cheng,Wei-Lin Tu, Chao-Jung Chen, Hong-Lin Chan, Chic-Feng Chen, Hsin-Hsin Chen, Pin-Chi Tang, Yen-Pai Lee, Shuen-Ei Chen, and San-Yuan Huang, entitled “Proteomic' analysis of thermal regulation of small yellow follicles in broiler-type Taiwan country chickens”, 55 (2): 120-136 were given the awards.

The 2020 Spring Meeting of JPSA will be held at Kyoto University in Kyoto, during 27–28 March. The meeting will contain an open symposium, council and general meetings. The theme of the symposium will be “The needs of Ph.D. status in the industries”. It will be a joint symposium with Japan Animal Science Association. The detail information will be provided at JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/oshirase/?lang=en).

The Journal of Poultry Science (JPS, the official journal of JPSA, Impact Factor: 0.670) always welcomes the submission of reviews and original papers. Free access to download the full-published articles in JPS is available on J-Stage (https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/browse/jpsa), which provides an excellent opportunity for all to access the published articles.

JPSA would like to contribute to the poultry science in Japan and over the world by enhancing the international activities with the members from different countries. Thus, JPSA has a membership category for foreign citizens residing abroad as “Special International Member”. The page charges to publish their papers in the JPS will be set at a membership price. JPSA invariably welcome new members from all over the world. Please visit JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/?lang=en) for further information.

Naoki Goto, Secretary of WPSA Japan Branch

Lebanon

The Lebanon Branch of WPSA held its annual meeting on October 5, 2019, at the Lancaster Hotel in Hazmieh, a suburb of Beirut, Lebanon. The meeting was attended by nearly all members as well as guests, totalling over 65 people. It was chaired by the President of the Branch, Dr Nuhad J. Daghir who welcomed the group and spoke about the upcoming conferences in Cordoba, Spain, in March 2020, and the WPC 2020, in Paris, France. He then introduced the secretary of the Branch, Dr Nada Usayran, who presented the branch’s report and the treasurer Mr. Samir Cortbawi, who presented the financial report. Both reports were unanimously approved by the members. The business meeting was then followed by the scientific program as shown below:

  1. From Farm to Fork: Assessment of Microbiological Acceptability of Skinless Chicken Breasts and antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia Coli associated with Lebanese poultry – Presented by Dr Issmat Kassem, American University of Beirut.
  2. Comparison between imported and locally produced SBM and its possible replacement with Safflower meal – Presented by Dr Mohamad Farran, American university of Beirut
  3. Industry Presentations:
    • Mr. Elie Srour from SHD, sal: Solvent extracted Soybean meal.
    • Mr. Mohamad Sinno from ZM Vegetable Oil industries, sal: High oil SBM

Presentations were followed by a discussion which lasted for one hour on all the topics presented and then all those attending were invited to lunch at the Hotel which was sponsored by SHD, one of the participating companies.

Dr Nadad Usayran, Branch Secretary

South Africa

2019 december SA 2The South African branch held its annual Scientific Day on 30 October 2019. The theme was ‘Enhancing Poultry Production,’ and the programme was started by Izaak Breitenbach, the general manager of the Broiler Organisation of the South African Poultry Association. He discussed the latest figures on imports and local production, and he presented his calculations on the necessary tariffs to keep the local Industry afloat. Those tariffs have been incorporated into the Poultry Master Plan.

We were fortunate to have a number of international speakers. Prof Richard Ducatelle from the University of Ghent, and Dr Wolfgang Siegert from the University of Hohenheim, each gave two presentations. Prof Ducatelle discussed the area of gut microbiota, and Dr Siegert talked about the role of glycine and serine as well as phytate degradation and phytase efficiency. Edward Diehl, from Cobb in the Netherlands, made another presentation on the latest developments in broiler nutrition. The day was also made richer by a local speaker, Rick Kleyn, and we enjoyed feedback and presentations from 4 local University students who presented results of their own research projects.

The branch also organized a successful Youth Programme, where the top students from local Universities had a 3 day tour of Poultry Facilities, their last day being spent attending the Scientific day (see pic). Attendance for the Scientific day was at a record high of 375 people.

2019 december SA 1

We sincerely thank all of our sponsors for this successful Scientific Day event.

Nicola Tyler, Secretary, South African branch

Sri Lanka

The Annual General Meeting of the Sri Lanka Branch was held on 27th September 2019, and the new committee took up office with Dr Vipula Dharmawardene as President. On the same day, the Annual Scientific Sessions & Industrial Evening were held at the Upper Crystal Ball Room, Hotel Taj Samudra, in Colombo.

Dr Ruwani Kalupahana served as the Chairperson for the Scientific Sessions.

Seven papers were presented as follows:

  • Antibiotic resistance patterns of Escherichia coli isolated from chicken meat.
  • Detection of ESBL producing E. coli from local chicken and related products ;preliminary results of an ongoing study.
  • Efficacy of locally developed SPA antigen and In-House ELISA comparing kits for screening of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in poultry.
  • Effect of Bitter Gourd seeds on Egg yolk colour in the Hyline strain of White Leghorn laying hens.
  • Effects of Dietary Active Dried Yeast and a phytogenic growth promoter on production performance, nutrient digestibility, visceral organ weights and serum lipid profile of broiler chicken.
  • Quality attributes of jerky prepared with different forms of chicken meat.
  • The Impact of Biochar on Phosphorus losses from three types of broiler litter material.

Industrial Evening

2019 december Sri lanka 1The Chief Guest for this occasion was Dr Roel Mulder, the Secretary General of WPSA.

Dr Mrs Renuka Jayatissa, Head of the Nutrition Department, Medical Research Institute, Consultant Medical Nutritionist, and President Sri Lanka Medical Nutrition association gave the Keynote Address on the theme: ‘Farm to Table – Quality Assurance of poultry products’.

The highlight of the Evening was the awarding of an Honorary Life membership in the World’s Poultry Science Association’s Sri Lanka branch to Dr Chin How Cheong, who is the Founder of the branch.

Dr Mrs A L Godwin, Secretary, Sri Lanka Branch

United Kingdom

The 33rd Poultry Science Symposium: ‘Pre and probiotics, nutrition, veterinary and production perspectives.’ will be held at Clare College, University of Cambridge, UK on 10 -12 August 2020.

The UK branch invites you to an interesting and current programme of world leading experts, that will discuss the nutritional, veterinary and production perspectives for the use of pre- and probiotics in poultry production. The scientific committee has arranged an exciting programme. The symposiums intention is to provide a thorough look at the antibiotic free sector from various perspectives, followed by good discussions about what we can do as professionals to maintain good gut and overall bird health. Topics will include an overview of AGPs, how they work and the challenges that occur in their absence, thorough definitions of additives in the pre and probiotic space and examples of how those probiotics work. How to test them, and how they interact with other additives will also be discussed, learning from our own and allied sectors. Poster submissions on related topics will be invited, with the submission portal opening on 1st January 2020. Further information, speakers and session information can be found at https://www.wpsa2020.org/. We look forward to seeing you there!

New Opportunity: The GD Rosen Academic Career Advancement Award

The UK branch is pleased to announce a new Academic Career Advancement Award in memory of Professor Gordon D Rosen. Gordon contributed a highly logical and very descriptive approach to animal nutrition from the 1960s through to just a few years before his death in 2015. A full obituary for him is available in volume 71 of World’s Poultry Science Journal. He was an inspirational person whose curiosity and gently framed yet penetrating questions made him a legend. There is a generation of scientists influenced by his presence – always in the front row – of scientific meetings, and now his wife Vanda would like to encourage other scientists to develop their own inquisitiveness through this new award.

The GD Rosen Academic Career Advancement Award provides £2000 each year to fund an academic adventure. With this aim, the award is open in nature, while particularly encouraging people to become multidisciplinary in their approach to research. The award is open to UK branch members who are within their early career spanning from 2 years to 5 years post PhD viva. Examples of proposals might include a request to attend an academic conference (particularly one outside your core field), support for an educational tour of another country or global region, support to visit another institution to learn a new technique or approach, or support to publish a major research output in a journal requiring publication fees.

Proposal forms and conditions of the GD Rosen Award can be found on the WPSA-UK website.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: 30th January 2020

Dr Emily Burton
Associate Professor in Sustainable Food Production
School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences
Nottingham Trent University, Brackenhurst Campus
Nottingham NG25 0QF, United Kingdom
Office phone: +44 (0)115 848 5346
Mobile phone: +44 (0)773 9988022

USA

The USA Branch has again conducted the Cliff Carpenter Student Essay Contest for providing financial support for 3 winning students to attend the 2020 World’s Poultry Congress in Paris, France. The Branch will also be providing Travel Grants for USA Branch members to attend WPC2020 who will be making oral or poster presentations.Dr Bob Buresh, Secretary, USA Branch

 

Volume 52, September 2020  Newsletter Editor: Dr G.B. Havenstein,  

 

2020 wpc

2020 wpc

 

World's Poultry Congres 2021

8-12 August 2021, Paris, France

 

 

Registration for WPC2021

Registration for WPC2021 is open. Click here for details.

 

Executive Committee

Secretary's Report

mulder roel

World’s Poultry Congress 2020 Paris, France, now in 2021

The new dates for the XXVI World’s Poultry Congress are 8-12 August 2021. More information on: wpcparis2021.com.

With regard to the scheduling of other WPSA symposia and conferences in the coming years, please avoid any overlapping with WPC2021. Please provide the new dates and other information for WPSA symposia and conferences to the WPSA office so it can be placed in the calendar on the website.

European Federation

The Mediterranean Poultry Summit in Cordoba Spain, is planned for 6-8 October 2021. WPSA Working Group symposia scheduled for 2021 will be postponed to 2022. The next European Poultry Conference in Valencia, Spain, 2022 will be postponed to 2023.

Asia Pacific Federation

The next World Waterfowl Conference will be held in Indonesia in 2021, the next APPC in November 2022 in China.

WPSA presence at exhibitions and conferences

Just before the lockdown of COVID-19, several Board members attended the IPPE in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Our booth was located in a very strategic place, so we were able to meet with many members and visitors.

Since, all exhibitions, most symposia and congresses planned for 2020 have been postponed or cancelled. As soon as the future situation allows, we will again begin attending exhibitions, symposia and conferences, in order to display promotional materials for WPSA, the World’s Poultry Science Journal, WPC 2021 in Paris, France, and for many other poultry related symposia and conferences. In the meantime in order to improve our communication with branches and members, the frequency of our newsletter has been increased to at least 6 times per year, and other news can also be seen on WPSA’s Facebook page.

World’s Poultry Science Journal

Starting in 2020, the World’s Poultry Science Journal is hosted and produced by Taylor and Francis Publishers. The transition from the previous publisher was well underway when the COVID-19 pandemic occurred. The pandemic has caused unprecedented disruption to our global distribution network. The good news is that the print and distribution of the journal has been resumed from 11th May. The March issue has been mailed, the June issue is underway and the necessary work for the September issue has been finalized. Of course, there still may be some delays because some countries are still operating with reduced or closed postal services, and international freight carriage is subject to delays and changes in routing at short notice.

The Editorial board of the Journal invites all members to submit reviews for the coming issues.

Cooperation with the organization on World Veterinary Education in Production Animal Health (WVEPAH):

The WVEPAH, a non-profit organization that organizes 3-4 week training courses on poultry in several countries. More details are on www.wvepah.org. All activities will also be announced on our website and in the WPS Journal.

Dr Roel Mulder, General Secretary

Treasurer's Report

bradley francine new

If you are reading this, I hope I can assume that you are in good health and continuing to protect yourself and family against COVID-19. Since the last Newsletter, our lives have continued in an atypical fashion. Your WPSA Executive Committee and Board members have been in frequent contact by phone, e-mail, and through the now-famous Zoom Meetings!

In addition to working with my colleagues on how to deal with and re-schedule all the WPSA events, postponed or cancelled during 2020, I have been carrying on with the regular work of the WPSA finances. I am very pleased to report that 90% of the companies who generously support the WPS Journal have paid their 2020 invoices for advertising and sponsorship. In addition, our hard-working Branch Secretaries have done a good job in dues collection and wiring the invoiced portion of international dues payment to me. I have been working with the Review of the Books Committee. They are in the middle of their task of going over the financial records of 2019. They will be submitting their report to Drs. Mulder and Yang. 

With the postponement of the World’s Poultry Congress until 2021, the 2020 WPSA Board Meeting that was scheduled for Paris will be conducted by - you guessed it - Zoom. I certainly will miss interacting in person with my colleagues, as well as greeting all of you in the City of Light.

As I write this, California is in the midst of a terrible heat wave and there are multiple wildfires raging throughout the state. I send wishes to you for more pleasant weather and freedom from natural disasters in your home areas.

Dr Francine Bradley, Treasurer

26th World's Poultry Congress

Palais de Congrès, August 8-12, 2021, Paris, France20WPC blocmarque blocdates

ONE YEAR TO GO UNTIL WE FINALLY MEET IN PARIS

The organising committee was expecting to welcome WPSA members from all around the world in Paris during August 2020, for the 26th WPC. The Covid-19 crisis resulted in its postponement. We are now counting on everybody to join us for a successful WPC2021 in Paris, on 8 to 12 August 2021. https://wpcparis2021.com/

All authors who submitted abstracts in 2019 have now received their reviews and comments since April 2020. They are now permitted to modify their accepted abstracts or amend them with new results. Amendments must be completed before 31 August 2020.

The submission site will reopen for new abstracts from 1 September to 31 December 2020. Do not miss this chance to present your latest work.

Registrations previously made for cancelled WPC2020 are valid for WPC2021. The same regular fee will be used for any new registrations made through 31 December 2020.

Holding the World Poultry Congress in 2021 gives the WPSA Organization the opportunity to celebrate its 100th anniversary, since the first WPC was held during 1921.

wpc2021 100Let's celebrate!

Christophe Bostvironnois, President French Branch
Michael Duclos, Secretary, French Branch
Michèle Tixier Boichard, WPC2020, Programme Coordinator

Newly Compiled List of Poultry Educational Resources

In her role as one of the Vice Presidents of the WPSA, Julie Roberts from the Australian Branch has compiled a list of Poultry Educational Resources which are available free of charge via the internet. Some of the web sites listed also have resources for sale. However, the focus of this list is resources which are free and therefore available to all members.

The list is posted on the WPSA website, and will always be a ‘work in progress’ as some resources become available and added, or others, if they are out of date or no longer available, will be removed from the internet list.

If members are aware of other resources that are available that could be added to the list, please contact Mrs Dorien Velner at the main office by email: with the title of the resource, how to access it and a short description.

All entries will be checked on a regular basis to make sure that they continue to be available, however if you find any irregularities, please contact us at

 

European Federation

The next European Poultry Conference will be held in Valencia, Spain in 2022.

The European Federation has numerous conferences planned between now and on into 2022. A list of most of our upcoming conferences may be found on the WPSA Calendar at www.wpsa.com
News from several European Federation Working Groups are provided below.

WPSA European Working Group News

WG2

2021 espn

In order to avoid overlapping with the WPC that has been changed to August 8 - 12, 2021, the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) has been moved from 2021 to take place at the same planned venue, Palacongressi in Rimini, from 5 to 8 September, 2022. Our Branch would like to thank VET International and Palacongressi of Rimini for their cooperation and understanding during this time. Despite this difficult situation, we also much appreciate sponsors and partners who are confirming their support for our event. Of course, we will work hard during the coming months to ensure the postponed edition of the 23rd ESPN is a success. The city of Rimini is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly Venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and will help forge the future of poultry meat science. Additional details are available at the Symposia website: https://www.espn2022.eu/

WG3

Breeding and Genetics

The 12th symposium on Breeding and Genetics is being planned. It will take place in Hannover, 8-10 November 2022, and will be hosted by the German Branch. We would be pleased if you save this date and plan your participation. Further information will follow in due course.

Steffen Weigend, Chairman of the European Federations Working Group 3

WG4

Quality of Eggs and Egg Products

Due to the postponement of the World’s Poultry Congress caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, the WG4 meeting has been re-scheduled to take place during WPC2021 in August 2021, in Paris. Members who want to suggest topics to be discussed are more than welcome and can send their suggestions to the Chairpersons (; ).

WG5

Poultry Meat Quality

2021 Eggmeat logo EMQ

As for all European Symposia, the next 'XXV European Symposium on the Quality of Poultry Meat' will be conjointly held with the 'XIX European Symposium on the Quality of Eggs and Egg Products' have been postponed to June 8 to 10, 2022 thanks to our cooperation with the Polish Branch. The venue will be in Kraków, Poland, and the website is already available. The next WG5 member meeting will be held during World's Poultry Congress 2021 in Paris, see the Congress Programme for the meeting time and location.

Please visit http://www.eggmeat2022.com/ to keep yourself updated. Special reduced registration fees will be available for WPSA members and students. We will look forward to seeing many of you there. Prominent invited speakers from American and European Institutions will address emerging issues on poultry meat and egg production.

Most WG5 members will also be participating in the 2021 World's Poultry Congress in Paris, France on August 8-12, and the scientific programme of the two parallel sessions dealing with 'Meat Quality' will be defined under the supervision of the WG5 group in connection with the Congress Scientific Committee of which the WG5 chairperson is a part.

Massimiliano Petracci, Secretary Italian Branch of WPSA

WG6

Incubation and Fertility Research Group (IFRG)

Due to the spread of the Covid-19 virus, which has created lots of uncertainty for traveling, WG6 (IFRG) has postponed its 2020 meeting and has rescheduled it for October 14-15, 2021 at the Holiday Inn in Leiden, The Netherlands. For more information see the website.

Ampai Nangsuay, Secretary WG6

WG10

Turkeys

The 11th 'Hafez' International Symposium on Turkey Production will be held in Berlin, Germany; May/June 2021. I hope to see you in Berlin.

Prof. Dr. Dr. H. M. Hafez, Institute of Poultry Diseases, Free University Berlin, Chair WG10


Asia Pacific Federation

WPSA Asian-Pacific Working Group News

A/P WG1

Small Scale Family Poultry Farming

As well as the global impact on human health, Covid-19 unfortunately has serious secondary effects on the poorest communities in less well-developed economies. Since 1998, global poverty has been trending downwards but forecasts from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund suggest that Covid-19 will push a further 49 million people into extreme poverty in 2020. This would increase the total number of people in poverty who often must survive on less than US $1.90 per day to around 665 million. Food supply and demand, production and distribution of food, all on top of restrictions due to the virus, will be heavily impacted.

We know that family poultry farming can contribute to a reduction of poverty and a general improvement in the social condition of the poor. Extra effort to promote this is now needed more than ever. Planned for the World Poultry Congress in Paris this year was a WG session on Small Scale Family Poultry Farming. This WG session will be carried over to the postponed dates of 8 - 12 August WPC2021 in Paris, France.

Alan M. Gibbins, Chairman A/P WG1

A/P WG2

Waterfowl

The 6th World Waterfowl Conference was held in Taipei, Taiwan, during October 2017, and a board meeting was organized during that conference in order to appoint a new Chairperson for the Waterfowl WG, and to choose the host country for the next Waterfowl conference. By vote of the WG members, I was elected to serve as the new Chairman, and Indonesia was asked to serve as the host country for the 7th WWC. I would like to express my appreciation to the Taiwan Organizing Committee and the Taiwan branch for hosting an excellent and well-organized event in 2017.

Originally, the 7th WWC was scheduled to be held during September 2021 in Tangerang near Jakarta, but because the 26th WPC in Paris has been postponed to August 2021 we decided to delay the 7th WWC to 2022. The dates are not yet determined. We thought that many participants at the 2021WPC in Paris would also have been interested in participating in the 7th WWC, but it would have been difficult for people to attend both conferences in one year, if the original date had been maintained.

The 7th WWC will consist of three different programmes : i) scientific programme, ii) business forum, and iii) a culinary programme. We expect to stimulate interactions between scientists and corporations, both domestic and international, during the conference. We sincerely hope that the 7th WWC will be as attractive and as enjoyable as the 2017 conference in Taipei, and I look forward to welcoming many of you to the event in 2022.

Hardi Prasetyo, WPSA Indonesia, Chairman

A/P WG3

Ratites

The Ratite Working Group held a general meeting on the 18th of March 2020 at 10:00 on the Oudtshoorn Research Farm, Oudtshoorn, South Africa. The next meeting has been re-scheduled, and will take place during the 2021 World Poultry Congress that will be held in Paris, France on 8-12 August. Please let us know if you are planning to attend the meeting and Congress, as well as any topics that you would like to have considered, by sending an email to 

Anel Engelbrecht, Chair

 

7th Mediterranean Poulty Summit

2021 7mpsDue to the current health situation and the uncertainty generated by the covid-19, the organizing Committees of the 7th Mediterranean Poultry Summit have decided to postpone again the event until October 6-8, 2021.

This difficult and sad decision is taken after a first postponement. At that time, we thought that the 6-month period contemplated for carrying out the MPS was enough time for the health situation to be controlled throughout the world. However, the world situation and the restrictions on capacity indoors suggest that a new postponement is the best option.

I hope the situation changes in one year and we can meet again face to face.

Thank you for your patience and support.

Warmest regards,

Carlos Garcés Narro

Details for the conference are shown on the website summit’s website: www.mpn-wpsa.org.

 

World's Poultry Science Journal

From 2020 the World’s Poultry Science Journal will be published by Taylor & Francis. If you have requested an online subscription as part of your membership, you have received an email from Taylor & Francis with instructions how to access WPSJ online from the new website www.tandfonline.com/TWPS. Please ensure that you add '@tandfonline.com' to your safe senders list to ensure these types of emails are not sent to your spam folder or blocked by your service provider. Should you have any questions about your online access please contact ”.

Upcoming articles

Articles in upcoming Journal(s)

  • Ashley England -  The influence of light of different wavelengths on laying hen production and egg quality
  • Fazul Nabi -  Nutraceutical role of selenium nanoparticles in poultry nutrition: A review
  • Leonie Jacobs -  Stakeholder perceptions on broiler chicken welfare during first-day processing and the pre-slaughter phase: a case-study in Belgium
  • Mehmet Bozkurt -  The Effect of Feed Structure on Gastrointestinal Tract Traits and Performance in Laying Hens: An Overview of 70 Years’ Experience
  • Àndrew Wales -  Review of hatchery transmission of bacteria with focus on Salmonella, chick pathogens and antimicrobial resistance
  • Sonja Liu -  Reduced-crude protein diets in chicken-meat production: justification for an imperative
  • Ana Marquiza Quilicot -  Plant-derived products for the control of poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer, 1778) – a review
  • Yumin Bao -  Amino acid nutrition and chicken gut health
  • Afaf Alnaser -  Poultry Industry in the Gulf Cooperation Council with Emphasis on Kuwait
  • Annemarie Mens -  Nutritional approaches to reduce or prevent feather pecking in laying hens: any potential to intervene during rearing?
  • Ebru Onbasilar -  Noninfectious Skeletal Disorders in Broilers
  • Kennady Vijavalakshmy -  Role of turmeric supplementation on stress management and production strategies in poultry nutrition
  • Rao Abbas -  Role of secondary metabolites of medicinal plants against Ascaridia galli
  • Anand Prakash -  Molecular basis of residual feed intake in broilers: A review

Summaries

The influence of light of different wavelengths on laying hen production and egg quality

ASHLEY ENGLAND and ISABELLE RUHNKE

Worldwide, commercial laying hens are frequently being used for only one production cycle mainly due to a decline in egg quality and/or egg quantity at 70-80 weeks of age. Extending the production cycle of these hens by improving or maintaining their egg quality and laying persistency could lead to both economic and environmental benefits as well as a more sustainable egg industry. Laying performance of the modern-day laying hen is highly dependent upon the light source used during housing and artificial lighting programs have been used for years to control egg production. Birds are able to perceive coloured light (400-700 nm) as well as the ultraviolet part of the spectrum (100-400 nm) due to the presence of an extra retinal cone in the eye. Studies have shown that red light, due to its longer wavelength of 660 nm, is able to stimulate the hypothalamus and elicit a photosexual response in all animals including birds. This can result in increased egg production in comparison to green, blue or white light exposure, although responses may be variable depending on bird strain and the intensity of the light used. Ultraviolet light has a shorter wavelength (100-400 nm) than visible light (400-700 nm) and so its effects on egg production are likely to be weak to non-existent. The benefits of UV light are mediated through its ability to activate cholecalciferol from 7-dehydroxycholesterol in the skin resulting in improvements in egg shell quality. These improvements in shell quality are most likely to occur in birds that are exposed to (natural) day light, as UV light can compensate to some extent the lack of Vitamin D in poultry diets. This review highlights the variable effects of light of different wavelengths and intensity on laying hen production, egg quality and its potential to extend the end of lay in commercial hens.

Nutraceutical role of selenium nanoparticles in poultry nutrition

F. NABI, M.A. ARAIN, F. HASSAN, M. UMAR, N. RAJPUT, M. ALAGAWANY, S.F. SYED, J. SOOMRO, F. SOOMRO and J. LIU

Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element with diverse physiological functions related to cellular homeostasis, body metabolism and antioxidant defence. Selenium is an integral constituent of at least 25 selenoproteins in the body that regulate cellular redox and antioxidant defence enzymes systems control free radicles of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Dietary Se plays key role in immunity, growth and fertility in chickens, which require optimum levels in their diets to maintain high reproductive and productive performance of birds. In the last decade, dietary supplementation with selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) has enhanced the growth performance, feed conversion ratio (FCR), reproductive performance, egg production, immune response and antioxidant status, as well as improved the quality of meat and eggs and promoted microflora. Selenium has been shown to increase relative weights of immune related organs (burse and thymus) to enhance immunity. Feeding Se-NPs can improve antioxidant status and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in both broilers and layers. Use of Se-NPs at 0.9 mg/kg diet in broilers improved the intestinal health via increasing the population of beneficial bacteria and producing short chain fatty acids. This review focuses on the significance of selenium nanoparticles in poultry industry and provides insights about its comparative advantages over conventional sources of Se in poultry diets.

Stakeholder perceptions on broiler chicken welfare during day of hatch processing and the pre-slaughter phase: a case-study in Belgium

EVELIEN LAMBRECHT, LEONIE JACOBS, EVELYNE DELEZIE, HANS DE STEUR, XAVIER GELLYNCK and FRANK TUYTTENS

Day of hatch and pre-slaughter processing are stressful events (involving selection, handling and transport) for broiler chickens, putting pressure on welfare, which has economic consequences. This case-study documented common industry practices and evaluated poultry industry stakeholder perceptions related to broiler welfare during day-of-hatch processing and the pre-slaughter phase. Twenty-three individual in-depth interviews were conducted with representatives of key stakeholders in the Flemish poultry sector: hatchery personnel (5), farmers (6), poultry catchers (2), transporters (3), and slaughterhouse personnel (7). The findings showed various factors influencing broiler welfare during day of hatch processing and the pre-slaughter phase, with some discrepancies between stakeholder views and the scientific evidence. While stakeholders perceived the day of hatch processing procedures of chicks to be relatively under control, with no major issues, literature points out several issues, including first-week mortality and time without feed and water as major welfare problems. For broilers at slaughter age, the industry stakeholders’ views aligned well with scientific evidence on major welfare issues, such as injuries, thermal stress, mortality during fasting, catching, loading, transportation and lairage. This study provides novel insights in stakeholder perceptions, and potential avenues for future research and actions to reduce animal welfare problems in the poultry sector.

The effect of feed structure on gastrointestinal tract traits and performance in laying hens: An overview of 70 Years’ Experience

M. BOZKURT, I. GIANNENAS, M.ÇABUK and A.E.TÜZÜN

A large amount of existing evidence shows that the micro- and macrostructure of feed has a strong influence on the function, development and health of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), which, in turn, affects the performance of poultry birds. Notably, the majority of data corresponding to feed structure-induced changes in the productivity of birds has been generated from studies using broiler chickens. However, feed particle size and feed form remain an obscure and undervalued area of study in the feeding of layer chickens, with sparse evidence reported between the 1940s and 2000s. Moreover, feed in the form of crumbles and pellets, which has made a major contribution to broiler production efficiency, has not been the feed of choice for layers, where mash diets have been common practice worldwide for many years. Nonetheless, the role of feed structure in the feeding of layer chickens has recently begun to attract more interest. However, results are divergent and often not as satisfactory as expected, except in the case of gizzard weight, which typically decreases by 8% and 16% on average with finely ground and pelleted feed, respectively. The results for most performance parameters, however, are typically insignificant. In some cases where the effect of the feed form was significant, pelleting increased feed consumption by 6%, whereas a clear 9% reduction was observed in another example. The incongruities in the results are likely due to confounding factors, such as management conditions and ingredient composition of the diets. Nevertheless, the effect of feed form on the investigated parameters was more evident than the effect of feed particle size. The following review provides an overview of data from seven decades regarding the implications of feed structure on the physiology, histology, metabolism and development of the gut and the performance of egg-laying chickens.

Review of hatchery transmission of bacteria with focus on Salmonella, chick pathogens and antimicrobial resistance

ANDREW WALES and ROBERT DAVIES

Commercial poultry hatcheries potentially provide a sanitary barrier between breeder flocks and their progeny. This is important, particularly within the pyramid breeding structures in integrated poultry production systems. However, the operation of hatcheries and their focal position connected with multiple flocks, both on the input and output sides, means that they are vulnerable to being reservoirs of infectious agents. Of particular concern for hatcheries is the pseudo-vertical transmission of bacteria that are initially deposited at the surface of forming or freshly-laid eggs. These bacteria (of which Salmonella enterica is a prime example) can subsequently be present in the chick, as well as spreading within the hatchery environment to colonise other hatching birds. Furthermore, if such infectious organisms become persistent in parts of the hatchery environment, this allows their repeated transfer to hatching individuals or even (via personnel and fomites) to transfer back into breeding flocks supplying the hatchery. The use of antimicrobial drugs in hatcheries adds the further hazard of seeding progeny with antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) organisms. The mechanisms of hatchery, egg and subsequent chick contamination have been understood, and strategies to counteract the spread and persistence of infectious agents are well-established. However, many studies examining bacterial pathogens and AMR organisms in poultry production implicate hatcheries, either as a link in a chain or as a source of such agents. This review outlines the challenges posed by hatchery operation to control of bacterial transmission, it examines the contemporary and historical evidence for such phenomena, and it briefly discusses strategies to counteract the issue.

Justifying reduced-crude protein diets in chicken-meat production

S. GREENHALGH, P.V. CHRYSTAL, P.H. SELLE and S. Y. LIU

The justification for the chicken-meat industry to develop reduced-crude protein (CP) diets is compelling. Environment pollution by nitrogen and ammonia emissions can be improved, as a dietary reduction of 25 g/kg CP has been shown to generate a 25.8% reduction in N excretion. Bird welfare can be enhanced, as lower CP excretion improves litter quality and lessens incidence of foot-pad dermatitis and related conditions. Flock health can be improved by reductions in the flow of undigested protein into the hindgut which, in unchecked, fuels the proliferation of potential pathogens at a time when in-feed inclusions of antibiotics are in decline. Moreover, reduced-CP diets have the potential to lessen feed ingredient costs as prices of ‘synthetic’ amino acids are likely to decrease due to economies of scale in production. The successful development and adoption of reduced-crude protein (CP) diets may reduce the chicken-meat industry’s demand for sources of ‘intact’ protein, e.g. where soybean meal is dominant and in demand from many quarters. Using synthetic methionine, lysine and threonine in maize-soy diets been shown to lead to a substantial reduction in dietary CP from 356 to 200 g/kg, along with reductions in soybean meal from 709 to 293 g/kg feed. Reductions of 40% of soyabean use in feed have been postulated.

Plant-derived products for the control of poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer, 1778) – a review

ANA MARQUIZA M. QUILICOT, ŽELJKO GOTTSTEIN, ESTELLA PRUKNER-RADOVČIĆ and DANIJELA HORVATEK TOMIĆ

The impact of Dermanyssus gallinae infestation on poultry health and production has driven the poultry industry to look for efficient control measures to be incorporated in integrated pest management (IPM). Attempts have been employed to control, if not, eliminate the infestation which includes application of chemicals, implementation of biological and/or physical measures, vaccination, or use of plant-derived products; or a combination of two or more of these measures. Chemical control, though efficient, has limitations such as the development of resistance in mite populations and safety issues concerning environmental residues and non-target organism toxicity. These limitations resulted in banning most of the previously applied synthetic acaricides; thus, attention has been directed to the potential of plant-derived products (PDPs). Among the PDPs reviewed, essential oils of bay, lime dis 5F, pimento berry, spearmint, cade, clove bud, penny royal, coriander, thyme, mustard, horseradish, sweet basil, peppermint and summer savoury results in up to 100% mortality by direct contact or fumigation. Whereas, garlic extract and essential oils of thyme, manuka, Eucalyptus citriodora and lavender produce mortality rates from 66-95.35% when applied directly or through spray. Three essential oils (penny royal, cinnamon bark and garlic) has ovicidal effect by direct contact. Other PDPs have the potential to reduce mite population and reproduction rates. This paper reviews PDPs on their efficacy, mode of action and effect on target organisms, advantages, and limitations. Recognizing the potentials and limitations of the different PDPs is important in formulating an effective product (combination of two or more PDPs) for the control of D. gallinae.

Amino acids nutrition and chicken gut health

Y. BAO

There is considerable interest in the development of reduced protein diets with supplemental amino acids (AA) for broiler chickens due to economic, environmental, health and bird welfare advantages. Lowering levels of protein, or using local sources, which may be more poorly digested or have an unbalanced AA profile, has implications for both animal performance and health. However, reduced protein diets may result in amino acid redistribution away from growth and production processes, toward intestinal cells involved in immune and inflammatory responses. Certain gut diseases are related to higher protein diets, and low protein formulations can reduce the risk of such problems. However, in low protein diets, a reduced or unbalanced supply of AA in the diet can be deleterious to the immune system. Therefore, an ideal dietary AA profile is crucial for broiler chicken gut health, especially in AGP free situations. All AA are in ratio to dietary Lys, and when Lys concentration is increased, both essential and non-essential AA concentrations need to be increased accordingly. Currently when dietary standardised ileal digestibility (SID) for Lys is 1.3%, the SID of total sulphur-containing AA (TSSA) may need to increase to 0.975%, Arg to 1.43%, Thr to 0.884%, Val to 1.04%, Ile to 0.884% and Phe to 0.845%. In wheat-soy based diets, reduced protein diets may lead to deficiencies in His and Ala, potentially affecting chicken gut health. Possibly the SID of His needs to increase to 0.53%. Some non-essential AA profiles need to increase, such as SID of Gly to 0.884%, Glu to 3.54% and Ala to 0.845%. Compared with DL-Methionine and DL-HMTBA, L-Met is the natural form of Met and its relative biological value (RBV) has remained controversial due to unsuitable statistical models and other limiting AA influence. Increasing AA levels in reduced protein diets has been shown to maintain growth and ensure less incidence of gut disorders.

Poultry industry in the Gulf Cooperation Council with emphasis on Kuwait

A. AL-NASSER, H. AL-KHALAIFAH, F. KHALIL and H. AL-MANSOUR

In Kuwait, per capita consumption of poultry meat was 64.4 kg/cap/yr from 2004-2016. This indicates the high demand for poultry meat in Kuwait, which cannot be met by local production alone. The Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR) has conducted poultry research projects into high quality and added-value poultry products, which could be utilised to enhance competitiveness in Kuwait production systems. Their scientific achievements include developing broiler and layer feed rations, improving FCR of broilers from 2.0 to 1.4, production of high-quality broilers, strict biosecurity measures on farm and enhanced diversity of poultry products, such as meat and eggs from Arabi chickens, quails, and ducks. However, more work is needed in areas of poultry feed and added value product technology. In addition, technology transfer of KISR Intellectual property (IP) and knowledge to the poultry industry is necessary. The goal of this paper was to show the major achievements of KISR poultry research; identify gaps and propose solutions to improve production and enhance local industry competitiveness, in addition to conservation of the endangered avian species; Falcons and Houbara.

Nutritional approaches to reduce or prevent feather pecking in laying hens: is there any potential to intervene during rearing?

A.J.W. MENS, M.M. VAN KRIMPEN and R.P. KWAKKEL

Feather pecking (FP) by laying hens is a significant welfare issue in the poultry industry. Pecking at and pulling out feathers of conspecifics can seriously reduce the well-being of birds and cause economic losses for the farmer. Records of the prevalence of FP in laying hen flocks from the last 20 years show a prevalence of between 24-94%. Several research groups world-wide have hypothesised about the causes of feather pecking. From a nutritional point of view, re-directed behaviour and feather eating seem to be the most plausible causes. The gut microbiome seems to be involved in FP due to its influence on hormonal pathways and as it is influenced by the diet, which might include feathers ingested by the hens. Bird experiences during the rearing period are related to FP in later life by possible effects on the physiological development of the pullets. Most likely, pullets experience a sensitive period within the first few weeks post-hatch during which FP can develop due to various factors such as hormonal influences, nutrition and (the lack of) environmental enrichment. Nutrition could influence FP in two ways. Deficiencies or imbalances in certain nutrients, such as amino acids may have a direct effect on physiological mechanisms that trigger FP. Furthermore, ingredients such as roughages, fibres and non-nutritive ingredients may have an effect on exploratory and foraging or feeding behaviour. Literature (mainly in adult layers) shows that nutritional interventions increased eating time by 23-45% and/or the mean retention time of feed in the gut by 2.9-6.0 min/g fibre, and reduced or delayed FP behaviour. Using such nutritional strategies (i.e. provision of specific AA profiles and/or high fibrous ingredients) during the sensitive period during rearing could prevent ultimately the development of FP, by altering the pullets’ (gut) physiology and/or her time budget allocation. Research with a focus on critical periods during rearing should be initiated.

Non-infectious skeletal disorders in broilers

H. ÇAPAR AKYÜZ and E.E. ONBAŞILAR

The incidence of non-infectious skeletal disorders has been reported to increase over the past decade. Both genetic selection and rearing conditions cause skeletal disorders in the broilers. The rapid increase in broiler body weight, along with weakened, immature tissues, causes deformations by putting extra load on the skeletal system. Non-infectious skeletal disorders found in commercial broilers include articular gout, degenerative joint disease, dyschondroplasia, rickets, rotational-angular deformities, spondylopathies and ruptured gastrocnemius tendon. In broilers, bilateral abnormalities affect around 17% of the population, but the most common disorders are unilateral abnormalities in terms of leg disorders. Articular gout occurs, causing up to 40% mortality, and femoral degeneration incidence ranged between 81.67 and 85.00% in commercial broilers. The heritabilities were found for tibial dyschondroplasia ranged from 0.13 to 0.18 in different broiler breeds. Non-infectious skeletal disorders have led to significant welfare problems, including pain and high mortality rate in broilers and losses to the producer, influencing the production and quality. The most crucial point here is to optimise the welfare conditions of the poultry administration.

Role of turmeric supplementation on production, physical and biochemical parameters in laying hens

DEVVRAT KOSTI, D.S. DAHIYA, RAJESH DALAL, B.S. TEWATIA and KENNADY VIJAYALAKSHMY

In order to meet the high demand for eggs, poultry producers are using certain feed strategies which can increase production, but may indirectly cause metabolic and other stress in the birds. To overcome these issues, natural plant extracts and ingredients, such as turmeric, can be added to the diet. The inclusion of turmeric, which has various beneficial properties, at levels of 0.75% and 1% in the diets can improve feed intake and significantly reduce cholesterol in broilers. Cholesterol in eggs has been shown to decrease by 16, 24 and 25% (P<0.05) when layers were fed 1, 2 and 4% turmeric in feed, respectively. Birds fed a high carbohydrate ration and supplemented with turmeric powder for 30 days prior to sexual maturity had 20% more egg production as compared to a control group. Lactobacillus spp. counts were significantly higher (P<0.01) in chickens fed 1% turmeric supplemented feed compared to unsupplemented birds. Hence, this review includes the effect of feeding turmeric on feed intake, feed conversion ratio, nutrient digestibility, biochemical parameters, egg production, egg qualities, intestinal morphology, gut bacteria and the genetic expression of toll-like receptors.

Role of secondary metabolites of medicinal plants against Ascaridia galli

MUHAMMAD ARFAN ZAMAN, RAO ZAHID ABBAS, WARDA QAMAR, MUHAMMAD FIAZ QAMAR, UZMA MEHREEN, ZOHAIB SHAHID and MUHAMMAD KAMRAN

In recent years, the roundworm Ascaridia galli has been found to be the most common poultry parasite, with 64.8% prevalence in flocks globally. It causes a 60% to 84% decrease in egg and meat production. Profitability is reduced without proper control of A. galli, and wide range of chemically synthetic anthelmintics are commonly used. Emergence of drug resistance in nematodes has made scientists search for effective replacements. Among the alternatives to anthelmintics, natural products can be used which are more environment, consumer and host friendly, due to lower or no toxic effects. Certain plants exhibit anthelmintic effects through secondary metabolites (SMB’s), such as terpenes (glycosides and saponins), phenolic compounds (flavonoids and tannins) and nitrogen containing compounds (alkaloids, cyanogenic glycosides and non-protein amino acids). Generally, SMB’s exhibit control of nematodes by causing starvation, damaging the external membrane, impairing fertility and growth rate and damaging musculature. In this review paper, the studies related to the screening of plants and their SMB’s activities (both in vivo and in vitro) are discussed. Some plants have efficacy more than 75% and comprehensive information about their taxonomy and dosage has been documented. Plants that have been found with intense efficacy against A. galli include Acanthus ilicifolius (100%), Cleome viscosa (100%), Osmium sanctum (100%), Murraya koenigii (100%), Sesbania grandiflora (90%), Citrus limon (87.5%), Polygonum hydropiper (83.3%), Swietenia macrophylla (76.6%) and Momordica charantia (75%). Important secondary metabolites include terpenoids (51.72%) followed by phenolic compounds (27.58%) and nitrogen-containing compounds (20.68%). Such plant-derived alternatives are almost 50% more cost effective than synthetic drugs.

Molecular basis of determining residual feed intake in broilers

A. PRAKASH, V.K. SAXENA, RAVI KUMAR GANDHAM, SIMMI TOMAR and M.K. SINGH

Understanding the expression of genes influencing low and high residual feed intake (RFI) is required to elucidate the basic molecular mechanism influencing feed efficiency. Molecular mechanisms affecting RFI are controlled by many factors, such as neural signals, hormones, mitochondrial efficiency, metabolic pathways, and nitrogen recycling. This review covers different aspects of molecular mechanisms affecting feed intake, growth and, oxidative stress affecting feed efficiency in broilers. Low RFI chickens maintain feed efficiency by reducing feed intake independent of body weight gain, by upregulating CD36, PPARa, HMGCS2 and GCG, and downregulating PCSK2, CALB1, SAT1 and SGK1. Hormones, like cholecystokinin and glucagon, act as an anorexigenic factor, whereas leptin induces feed intake. Various molecular pathways and metabolic signals, such as the central melanocortin system, AMPK pathway, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and PI3K/Akt pathway control feed intake by determining the energy status of the body. A major cause of low feed efficiency in broilers is due to the reactive oxygen species-mediated oxidation of protein. Genes related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system such as DERL1, UFD1L, and UFM1 are down-regulated in highly feed efficient broilers. In addition, the expression patterns of the genes involved in mitochondrial energy production, such as avANT, COX III, avUCP, iNOS, PPAR2 and avPGC-1a, have been changed, and these can be a marker for selection against lower RFI in chickens.

 

New Book

2020 breeder signals

Description

‘Broiler breeders require full attention. Two sexes with completely different requirements is like managing two different species in one flock.’

Poultry meat is the most important animal protein source in the human diet. As a consequence, global production of broiler meat is rapidly growing to over 125 million tons in 2020. A relatively small number of broiler breeders has a major impact on the whole poultry meat chain. The continuing increase in the genetic potential of broilers makes the production of first class chicks increasingly challenging. State of the art management is crucial for a successful flock. Differences in results up to 10 day-old chicks per hen housed are not rare, costing tens of thousands of euros.

Breeder Signals contains practical information about broiler breeders to ensure a maximum production of first grade hatching eggs. With practical tools and modern insights to optimise sexual behaviour, fertility, egg production, and hatchability, based on the look-think-act approach. Feathering provides you signals about the quality of your flock. Too nice? Then they are hardly mating. Too little? These hens will not mate since it will be painful. The book follows the day-old-chick arriving at the rearing house towards the laying period up to egg transport to the hatchery.

https://www.breedersignals.com/en/

 Breeder Signals is essential for all people working in the poultry meat chain as breeder farm managers, farm workers, advisors, veterinarians, students, etc.

Breeder Signals is part of the Poultry Signals series©.

Preview

Branch News

Australia

The Poultry Research Foundation of the University of Sydney, in conjunction with the Australian Branch of WPSA, cordially invites you to the 32nd Australian Poultry Science Symposium (APSS) that will be held on February 9-10, 2021 at the University of Sydney, Camperdown Campus, Australia. The 32nd APSS 2021 will be available both in person and online. For details see: https://www.apss2021.com.au/

Online Paper Submissions opened on Wednesday 1st July, 2020 – submissions close Wednesday 30th September at 11.59 pm, Australian Eastern Standard Time.

The APSS is the premier avian science conference in Australia, attracting delegates from right across Australia and all around the world.

For 2021, we are excited to announce that, for the first time, our conference will be presented as a HYBRID EVENT, meaning that we will still have a physical event in Sydney, but will also stream the event LIVE ONLINE, so that delegates can attend from their workplaces or from home. In these unprecedented times, we felt that it was vital that our international attendees could still participate in our world-renowned event. So, by using one of the most cutting-edge conference platforms, we are opening up our event globally, and potentially to a larger audience than ever before.

We predict that there will be a significant decrease in physical attendees, so we have made the decision to move the physical event back to the University of Sydney Campus next year. In recent years, it has been held at the Sheraton Hotel in central Sydney. We plan, however, to take the event back to central Sydney again as soon as possible.

As always, APSS will continue to include an array of excellent invited speakers to be featured at the event. We will also provide our delegates plenty of time to network and communicate by offering a lively social programme, which will include both our physical and virtual attendees.

Major Themes
  • Gut Health Layer
  • Breeder Nutrition and Management Antimicrobial Stewardship
Hot Topic
  • Layer Hen Welfare
Preliminary Invited Speakers
  • Robert Renema – Canada
  • Bec Forder – South Australia
  • Kenneth Anderson – USA
  • David Marks – New Zealand
  • Sam Abraham – Western Australia
  • Maarten de Gussem – Belgium

For more information please contact
Email. or
Phone: +61 2 9351 1656
Website: https://www.apss2021.com.au/

Julie Roberts, President, Australia Branch

Azerbaijan

The spread of COVID-19 or corona virus is a rapidly developing situation. With considerable effects felt socially and economically across the globe, there is a growing awareness that we are all facing considerable challenges. 

The Scientific Research Institute of Animal Husbandry in the Ministry of Agriculture of the Azerbaijan Republic, including the members of the Azerbaijan Branch of WPSA, has continued to support the poultry sector during the corona virus pandemic. Experts from our Institute have organized online training sessions for farmers on several different topics, including 'Feeding technology for breeding birds', 'Features of goose breeding on farms', Technology of broiler meat production', etc.

We plan to hold an international conference that will be named 'Tendencies of Poultry Development. Innovative Technologies Applied to Poultry'. Tentatively, that conference will be held on the 5th of October 2020. If the corona virus lockdown continues, however, the conference will be converted to a video conference.

Mahir Hajiyev, President, Azerbaijan branch

Brazil

FACTA WPSA-Brazil Conference discussed the evolution of aviculture permeated by the concept of ‘One Health’

National and international speakers collaborated to deliver the rich content present throughout the event

 The FACTA WPSA-Brazil 2020 Conference finished on the Thursday night of August 13th marked a historical moment for Brazilian aviculture, after being organized entirely online. For three days, national and international lecturers spoke to attendants from 16 countries, producing a confluence of highly technical content relevant for the sector.

The event’s 37th edition counted with simultaneous translation into English and Spanish and, although remotely, participants interacted through questions sent to moderators and presented to the speakers in sequence.

This edition’s chosen theme was ‘One Health’, which, according to Ricardo Santin, executive director of the Brazilian Association of Animal Protein (ABPA) and vice-president of the International Poultry Council (IPC), is an essential discussion for Brazilian aviculture. ‘New technologies, innovation and applied science are cornerstones of a strong sector and international competitiveness. In times of fighting against human diseases such as Covid, and animal ones such as Avian Influenza and the African Swine Fever, the meaning of discussing ‘One Health’ is more evident, so that we can achieve desirable and sustainable results in all respects’, he stated.

Santin was responsible for the Conference’s opening lecture, in which he highlighted the country’s attributes. ‘Throughout five decades of strong investment and entrepreneurship of the sector, with a management model integrating producers and agro-industries, Brazil’s aviculture has laid solid foundations that have consolidated into enviable strength. Strong investments in technology and product customization were supplements to the country’s technical competence in Veterinary Medicine and Zootechny, as it continues to be the single great global producer never to record Avian Influenza. Natural advantages such as the climate and other favourable aspects are complemented by the wide offer of grains’, he detailed.

For FACTA’s president, Irenilza de Alencar Nääs, the online Conference was a historical moment for Brazilian aviculture, one that required enormous efforts from the foundation’s board to overcome the various technological and ideological barriers of its members. ‘Not everyone was confident that it would work out, but we did not allow the pandemic or the difficulties to bring us down and we believe that in this ‘new normality’ it is still possible to make a high quality conference. This is shown by our participants exceeding 400 people from 16 different countries and the expansion of our collaboration network into Latin American aviculture’.

She added that the event’s success, with high and steady viewing rates through all three days, was due to a confluence of excellent ideas from all of FACTA’s team, assertive actions and speakers with great commitment and motivation to make it into the brilliant conference everyone was presented with.

Awards and tributes

In the first day of the event, there was held the presentation of the award winning works of the 2020 Lamas Award in the Nutrition, Sanity, Production and Other Areas categories. The best works in each category were awarded with a registration for FACTA WPSA-Brazil 2021 Conference and the FACTA Collection books.

All 53 registered works are available in the FACTA annals, which can be accessed in the event’s website: www.facta.org.br/conferencia2020/premiolamas.

On the same day, veterinary doctor José Di Fábio was awarded the ‘Professional of the Year’ FACTA Award, a decoration presented to technical/scientific professionals of notorious merit. Finally, the FACTA board also made a tribute to journalist José Carlos Godoy and the entity’s former employee Nilza Marcondes, for their contributions to the foundation and Brazilian aviculture.  

France

The 16 members of the board of the French branch of WPSA elected the following members to serve as the Executive Committee for the branch:

  • President: Dr Christophe Bostvironnois
  • Secretary: Dr Michel Duclos
  • Treasurer: Mrs Catherine Hamelin
  • Vice-president in charge of the organisation of WPC2021: Dr Michèle Tixier-Boichard
  • Vice-president in charge of relationships with Poultry Industry: Mr Michel Lessire

See http://wpsa.fr/qui-sommes-nous/conseil-administration

Christophe Bostvironnois, President, and Michel Duclos, secretary WPSA FranceChristophe Bostvironnois, President, WPSA France 

Germany

The German branch is beginning to organize its next conference that will be held at the Weihenstephan-Triesdorf University of Applied Sciences (Campus Triesdorf). The meeting is scheduled for March 9-10, 2021.

Inga Tiemann, Secretary, Germany Branch

Indonesia

The Indonesian Branch of WPSA will organize and hot a World Waterfowl Conference during 2022 in Jakarta. More information on the conference will be posted as our plans are developed.

Luthi Mahfudz

Italy

The Italian Branch will host the 23rd edition of European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) which will be held at the Palacongressi of Rimini (Italy) from 5 to 8 September, 2022. The city of Rimini, is an ideal place for the European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and the modern as well as eco-friendly Venue is the perfect stage for the event. Many attendees including both poultry research scientists and practitioners, leading speakers from across the world joining together to explore the past, share the present and helping to forge the future of poultry meat science. More details are already available at the Symposia website: https://www.espn2022.eu/.

2022 ESPN logo

Massimiliano Petracci, Secretary, Italian Branch of WPSA
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Japan

The 2021 Spring Meeting of JPSA will be held at Kyushu University in Fukuoka, during 29–30 March where presentations of original research findings, a symposium, a general meeting and a council meeting will be organized. The council meeting will be held on March 29, and the presentations of research findings as well as the general meeting will be organized on March 30. However, if the Covid-19 situation continues, the meeting will probably be held in an online (Web) form. Members of JPSA will be kept informed as to how this meeting will be handled.

The Journal of Poultry Science (JPS - the official journal of JPSA, IF: 0.880), recently became a member of PubMed Central (PMC), and the articles of the JPS can now be accessed through the PubMed search engine. We welcome contributions of original research articles and reviews to the JPS using the following web site: https://jpn-psa.jp/en/jps-en/. Free access to download the full-published articles in JPS is available on J-Stage (https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/browse/jpsa), which provides an excellent opportunity for all to access the scientific articles published in JPS.

JPSA wants to contribute, not only to poultry science in Japan, but also internationally, by enhancing its interaction with members from different countries. Thus, JPSA has a membership category for foreign citizens residing abroad as ‘Special International Member’. The page charges for publishing in the JPS for such members will be set at the regular membership price. JPSA enthusiastically welcomes new members from all over the world. Please visit the JPSA website (http://jpn-psa.jp/?lang=en) for further information.

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a tough situation in the world, but JPSA hopes things will get better soon. Please take good care of yourself!

Naoki Goto, Secretary of WPSA Japan Branch

New Zealand

The 2020 New Zealand Poultry Industry Conference will be held on 6-7 October 2020, in Nelson, New Zealand

Reza Abdollahi, Secretary, New Zealand Branch

Sri Lanka

WPSA SRI LANKA BRANCH NEWS

The Sri Lanka Branch will be havng its Annual Scientific Sessions and Industrial Evening on 23rd October 2020, at Hotel Taj Samudra Colombo. At the Scientific sessions there will be research papers by local scientists both oral and poster presentations on topics related to poultry. As customary the best presentation is given an award.
The theme for the evening is ‘Economic Impact on Covid19 for the Poultry Industry’.
Due to the prevailing Covid19 situation we have to restrict participation, hence there will not be any foreign participants. However we have invited Dr Chin How Cheong our honourable life member from Singapore to give a presentation on a virtual platform
Locally we hope to get an expert Economist as our Guest Speaker on the theme.

The days’ proceedings will end with an Industry Awards Ceremony and dinner  at the same venue.

Turkey

The WPSA Turkish Branch decided to hold our board meetings online from now on with the participation of all board members.

During our initial on-line meeting, it was decided to hold discussions with the Ministry of Agriculture and other professional associations after the lifting of restrictions and to exchange ideas for solving the many difficulties currently facing the poultry sector due to the pandemic. Another decision taken was that our Biennial National Poultry Congress for Turkey will be scheduled for the second half of 2021 with the cooperation of one of our universities.

Prof. Dr. Kâzım Şahin, Secretary of the Turkish Branch

USA

The USA and Canadian branches of the WPSA hosted the annual WPSA Lecture that was presented on July 20th during the Poultry Science Association’s first ever virtual Annual Meeting. The speaker was Dr. Frank Mitloehner from the Department of Animal Science at the University of California-Davis campus, and the topic was ‘The 2050 Challenge: Feeding the World Without Wasting It.’ Dr. Mitloehner addressed the true impact of poultry and livestock production on climate change and how we as poultry scientists might help share these messages with the public. The WPSA Lecture served as the Keynote address for this year’s virtual Annual Meeting and was exceptionally well attended.

Bob Buresh, WPSA Senior Vice President, and Secretary USA Branch 

 

WPSA Calendar

For all WPSA meetings see the WPSA Calendar

Travel Grant Programme

For information about the Travel Grant Programmes click here.

 

Travel Grants can only be requested for WPSA events.

Only WPSA members can apply.

 

Travel Grant application forms

Speakers' Bureau Programme

For information about the Speakers' Bureau Programme click here.

 

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